Re: [Videolib] DVDs which come with books loan policy

Christine Godin (diractor@yahoo.com)
Thu, 2 Aug 2007 16:50:01 -0700 (PDT)

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What caught my attention was the extensive loan period for faculty. If you are buying these titles for a shared collection and they end up tucked away in some faculty office to gather dust what good are they to your students? My feeling is that if a particular faculty member really needs to OWN something they should buy it themselves or ask their department to buy it. At my institution we respect our faculty but don't revere them to the extent that they can compromise our service to students. Down off my soapbox now.

As to dividing materials, we do so and are careful to assign barcodes to all the items and their call numbers so they can be retrieved if the patron wants them all to check out.If the book part is more of a guide (a teacher's guide, for instance), we shelve it right alongside the video or DVD.

Christine Godin
Northwest Vista College
San Antonio, TX

Nell Chenault <njchenau@vcu.edu> wrote:
Hello,
We are reviewing our mixed media policy (which we do every 8 years or
so). How do you handle discs and other media which accompany books? We
are receiving more of this material which come with DVDs. Also, more of
our films on DVD format may also come with books. This is especially
true in the fine arts. The majority of our mixed media collections are
still CD-ROM.

Our policy has been to shelve the books within the book stacks and
circulate the books the normal book loan length. As an urban
university, we separate the discs and shelve them in the media center
for security purposes. The media loan length is governed by the format,
i.e. DVD's by the film loan policy (3 days or booked), CD-Roms by the
computer software loan policy (3 weeks), music recordings (1 week), etc..

This is a problem if the media item is truely integrated with the use of
the book. Example: The user has a short loan of the dvd, but may have
the book loan for months or years. Yet, if the focus of the combined
title is the media, the extended loan period of the book may keep a film
on loan for years (faculty loan), when it may have been purchased for
classroom support.

Thoughts? Solutions?

Do any of you leave these discs with the books in the open stacks? If
so, what is the theft rate? Do you make back-up copies? If so, what
ratio of the discs come copy protected?

Thanks in advance for any ideas!

Nell Chenault
VCU Libraries
VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.


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<div>What caught my attention was the extensive loan period for faculty. If you are buying these titles for a shared collection and they end up tucked away in some faculty office to gather dust what good are they to your students? My feeling is that if a particular faculty member really needs to OWN something they should buy it themselves or ask their department to buy it.&nbsp; At my institution we respect our faculty but don't revere them to the extent that they can compromise our service to students. Down off my soapbox now.<IMG src="http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/tsmileys2/19.gif"></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>As to dividing materials, we do so and are careful to assign barcodes to all the items and their call numbers so they can be retrieved if the patron wants them all to check out.If the book part is more of a guide (a teacher's guide, for instance), we
<div>Northwest Vista College</div> <div>San Antonio, TX<BR><BR><B><I>Nell Chenault &lt;njchenau@vcu.edu&gt;</I></B> wrote:</div> <BLOCKQUOTE class=replbq style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">Hello,<BR>We are reviewing our mixed media policy (which we do every 8 years or <BR>so). How do you handle discs and other media which accompany books? We <BR>are receiving more of this material which come with DVDs. Also, more of <BR>our films on DVD format may also come with books. This is especially <BR>true in the fine arts. The majority of our mixed media collections are <BR>still CD-ROM.<BR><BR>Our policy has been to shelve the books within the book stacks and <BR>circulate the books the normal book loan length. As an urban <BR>university, we separate the discs and shelve them in the media center <BR>for security purposes. The media loan length is governed by the format, <BR>i.e. DVD's by the film loan policy (3 days or booked), CD-Roms by
the <BR>computer software loan policy (3 weeks), music recordings (1 week), etc..<BR><BR>This is a problem if the media item is truely integrated with the use of <BR>the book. Example: The user has a short loan of the dvd, but may have <BR>the book loan for months or years. Yet, if the focus of the combined <BR>title is the media, the extended loan period of the book may keep a film <BR>on loan for years (faculty loan), when it may have been purchased for <BR>classroom support.<BR><BR>Thoughts? Solutions?<BR><BR>Do any of you leave these discs with the books in the open stacks? If <BR>so, what is the theft rate? Do you make back-up copies? If so, what <BR>ratio of the discs come copy protected?<BR><BR>Thanks in advance for any ideas!<BR><BR>Nell Chenault<BR>VCU Libraries<BR>VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video
formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.<BR></BLOCKQUOTE><BR><p>&#32;
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that gives answers</a>, not web links.

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VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.