Re: [Videolib] Results of ALA VRT's Video Librarian and Video

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Thu, 12 Jul 2007 15:15:28 -0700

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Very very interesting, Michael and Meghann.

I was struck in particular by the demographics. If 40% of us are between
50 and 59, 40% of us within a reasonable stone's throw of
retirement. Wonder what happens then. My guess is that the aforementioned
40% were hired into or slid over into mediadom as a result of the so-called
"video revolution" of the 1970s and 80s...a time in which the content
universe and the delivery technologies were unique to libraries...the
enterprise itself was unique. This is no longer the case. Media delivery,
as we all know, is rapidly converging with other forms of information
delivery. I think there is an almost universal perception (outside of our
small professional clique) that the specialization is no longer really
needed (if it ever was). This, of course, is utter bushwah...but tell
that to administrators closely watching the bottom line. Weird that an
academic administrator would never think about dumping or amalgamating
subject bibliographer/selector positions, but a media librarian's postion...???

In any case...makes one ponder and fret about the long term.

Oh, by the way, at the risk of being labelled reactionary and
backward-looking, in regard to your statement: Most (87%) video librarians
hold a Masters in Library or Information Science. A handful hold only an
Associates or Bachelors (3%),

in my neck of the academic woods, there's no such thing as a librarian
without an MLS. In light of my statement above re the instability of the
professional specialization, I'm wondering if this is such a musty notion,
after all. I think we need all the creds we can bring with us.

Gary

At 11:57 AM 7/12/2007, you wrote:
>[Please excuse cross-posting. -- MM]
>
>All,
>
>A few months ago we sent out a request for those self identifying as
>"video librarians" or those in charge of managing video collections at
>their institutions to participate in one or more surveys on those
>subjects. We have now finished the surveys and have initial summary data
>back that we would like to share with you. You can access the PDF files
>with the summaries on the VRT (ALA Video Round Table) website at:
><http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/vrtresources/vrt2007surveys.htm>http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/vrtresources/vrt2007surveys.htm
>
>
>We will be doing additional analyses of the data over the next several
>months and hope to report on it in one or more publications or
>presentations. We would encourage any of you that would like us to focus
>on particular areas to let us know, as we would like to be able to present
>on those areas of most interest to librarians. Also, if you have any
>questions or comments, feel free to contact either of us directly.
>
>Also newly available at the VRT website and of possible interest to media
>librarians are the notes of the 2007 meeting of the Digital Media
>Discussion Group, which meets annually at ALA Midwinter Conferences to
>discuss a variety of issues pertaining to digital media and
>libraries:
><http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/aboutvrt/vrtdmdg.htm>http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/aboutvrt/vrtdmdg.htm
>
>
>Thank you,
>
>Michael Brewer & Meghann Matwichuk
><mailto:brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu>brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu
><mailto:mtwchk@UDel.Edu>mtwchk@UDel.Edu
>
>*************************
>Meghann Matwichuk, M.S.
>Senior Assistant Librarian
>Instructional Media Collection Department
>Morris Library, University of Delaware
>181 S. College Ave.
>Newark, DE 19717
>(302) 831-1475<http://www.lib.udel.edu/ud/instructionalmedia/>
>

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"In societies where modern conditions of production prevail, all of life
presents itself as an immense accumulation of spectacles."

--Guy Debord

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Very very interesting, Michael and Meghann.

I was struck in particular by the demographics.  If 40% of us are between 50 and 59,  40% of us within a reasonable stone's throw of retirement.  Wonder what happens then.  My guess is that the aforementioned 40% were hired into or slid over into mediadom as a result of the so-called "video revolution" of the 1970s and 80s...a time in which the content universe and the delivery technologies were unique to libraries...the enterprise itself was unique.  This is no longer the case.  Media delivery, as we all know, is rapidly converging with other forms of information delivery.  I think there is an almost universal perception (outside of our small professional clique) that the specialization is no longer really needed (if it ever was).   This, of course, is utter bushwah...but tell that to administrators closely watching the bottom line.     Weird that an academic administrator would never think about dumping or amalgamating subject bibliographer/selector positions, but a media librarian's postion...???

In any case...makes one ponder and fret about the long term.

Oh, by the way, at the risk of being labelled reactionary and backward-looking, in regard to your statement:  Most (87%) video librarians hold a Masters in Library or Information Science. A handful hold only an Associates or Bachelors (3%), 

in my neck of the academic woods, there's no such thing as a librarian without an MLS.  In light of my statement above re the instability of the professional specialization, I'm wondering if this is such a musty notion, after all.   I think we need all the creds we can bring with us.

Gary


At 11:57 AM 7/12/2007, you wrote:

[Please excuse cross-posting.= -- MM]

All,
 
A few months ago we sent out a request for those self identifying as =93video librarians=94 or those in charge of managing video collections at their institutions to participate in one or more surveys on those subjects.  We have now finished the surveys and have initial summary data back that we would like to share with you.  You can access the PDF files with the summaries on the VRT (ALA Video Round Table) website at: http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/vrtresources/vrt2007surveys.htm
 
We will be doing additional analyses of the data over the next several months and hope to report on it in one or more publications or presentations.  We would encourage any of you that would like us to focus on particular areas to let us know, as we would like to be able to present on those areas of most interest to librarians.  Also, if you have any questions or comments, feel free to contact either of us directly.

Also newly available at the VRT website and of possible interest to media librarians are the notes of the 2007 meeting of the Digital Media Discussion Group, which meets annually at ALA Midwinter Conferences to discuss a variety of issues pertaining to digital media and libraries:  http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/aboutvrt/vrtdmdg.htm
 
Thank you,
 
Michael Brewer & Meghann Matwichuk
brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu
mtwchk@UDel.Edu
 
*************************
Meghann Matwichuk, M.S.
Senior Assistant Librarian
Instructional Media Collection Department
Morris Library, University of Delaware
181 S. College Ave.
Newark, DE 19717
(302) 831-1475
 

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"In societies where modern conditions of production prevail, all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation of spectacles."

--Guy Debord

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VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.