Re: [Videolib] Streaming Videos from the Collection

James Steffen (jsteffe@emory.edu)
Fri, 15 Jun 2007 16:43:25 -0400

Quoting Mark Kopp <mkopp@iu08.org>:

> Now that it's been mentioned a couple times, I'm now curious. What
> are the "advanced" European countries? What is the definition of
> "advanced"? What do they "have" that makes them so "advanced"?

I had in mind something very specific--I can't speak for other Western
European countries, but I read that the Netherlands is ahead of the US
in terms faster broadband and wireless internet connections. Of course,
it's a much smaller country with a higher population density.

Quoting Steven Harris <SteHar@library.lib.usu.edu>:

> *I am in favor of deploying Web 2.0 kinds of services and interfaces.
> I think those are all about giving people meaningful ways of
> interacting with information (and with each other). Lots of Web 2.0
> services, however, have a foot in the tangible (not online) world.
> Amazon lets users interact with the site and each other, and offers
> up their data for use on other web sites, but they still sell THINGS!
> Libraries ought to employ the same kind of dynamic.

Absolutely! Library websites should be more flexible, interactive, and
social(!), like the Amazon.com interface.

Here's one product that looks promising in that regard-- Primo by Exlibris:

http://www.exlibrisgroup.com/primo.htm

I really like the idea that users can tag and rate items in the library
catalog. Also, I'd like to see the ability to organize and share public
lists with room for comments/annotations, like you can do on Amazon.
It'd be a wonderful educational tool, especially since the lists link
directly with items in the library's collection.

James

-- 
James M. Steffen
Film Studies and Media Librarian
Theater Studies Subject Liaison
Marian K. Heilbrun Music and Media Library
Emory University
540 Asbury Circle
Atlanta, GA 30322-2870

Phone: (404) 727-8107 FAX: (404) 727-2257 Email: jsteffe@emory.edu

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.