Re: [Videolib] Showing of recent release film

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Wed, 13 Jun 2007 09:03:29 -0700

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hullo Francis

I'll make this very simple: the copyright law allows you to "display or
perform" (i.e. make the images visible and the sounds audible) a
copyrighted film or video in the service of face-to-face teaching (defined
as regular instruction in a place where instruction usually occurs). You
can also show a copyrighted video (purchased or rented) to a small group of
family and friends in your home (hence the term "home video")

The right to all other types of "performance/display" of whole works is the
exclusive right of the copyright holder. In other words to show a film in
an extracurricular setting (regardless of whether your charge or not,
regardless of whether the screening is broadly "educational") you need to
secure (i.e. buy) public performance rights.

OK?

Gary Handman

At 08:33 AM 6/13/2007, you wrote:

>I know this has been discussed before, but will someone explain the
>guidelines for showing a recent release film to students as a student
>serves activity. There will be no charge. Is there a policy difference
>between renting the movie and the library purchasing the movie?
>Thank you,
>
>Francis Kuykendall
>South Arkansas Community College
>Library
>fkuykendall@southark.edu
>
>VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
>issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
>control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in
>libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve
>as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of
>communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
>producers and distributors.

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"In societies where modern conditions of production prevail, all of life
presents itself as an immense accumulation of spectacles."

--Guy Debord

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hullo Francis

I'll make this very simple:  the copyright law allows you to "display or perform" (i.e. make the images visible and the sounds audible) a copyrighted film or video in the service of face-to-face teaching (defined as regular instruction in a place where instruction usually occurs).   You can also show a copyrighted video (purchased or rented) to a small group of family and friends in your home (hence the term "home video")

The right to all other types of "performance/display" of whole works is the exclusive right of the copyright holder.  In other words to show a film in an extracurricular setting (regardless of whether your charge or not, regardless of whether the screening is broadly "educational") you need to secure (i.e. buy) public performance rights. 

OK?

Gary Handman


At 08:33 AM 6/13/2007, you wrote:


I know this has been discussed before, but will someone explain the
guidelines for showing a recent release film to students as a student
serves activity. There will be no charge. Is there a policy difference
between renting the movie and the library purchasing the movie?
Thank you,

Francis Kuykendall
South Arkansas Community College
Library
fkuykendall@southark.edu

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"In societies where modern conditions of production prevail, all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation of spectacles."

--Guy Debord

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VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.