[Videolib] Librarians' Interest in Media (was Nothing about Videos...)

Meghann Matwichuk (mtwchk@udel.edu)
Tue, 24 Apr 2007 12:00:43 -0400

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This is an interesting conversation... I'd like to offer a glimmer of
hope, with the caveat that I certainly agree that many librarians could
use a boost in the media literacy department. Things are certainly
picking up as far as media is concerned, especially where new
technologies are involved. The Video Round Table's Digital Media
Discussion Group has a session at every ALA midwinter meeting, and the
attendance has jumped by leaps and bounds over the past few years. The
first year I attended was in 2005 and we had around ten folks. In 2006,
we had about 25 people and not nearly enough time to cover the topics
that everyone wanted to discuss. This year, we had a larger room and a
longer time slot; still not enough time and way too small of a room with
over 70 attendees from academic, public, and school libraries, as well
as vendors and filmmakers. Major topics covered included new high
definition market technologies, multimedia production in libraries,
streaming of media resources, and video gaming in libraries. Yes, the
technological aspects receive more attention that the content at this
point, but truly it's inseparable. Media literacy is a huge topic and
I'm glad to see that it's being discussed on this listserv -- I know
it's something that VRT has talked about now and again for possible
future programming ideas...

Best,

*************************
Meghann Matwichuk, M.S.
Senior Assistant Librarian
Instructional Media Collection Department
Morris Library, University of Delaware
181 S. College Ave.
Newark, DE 19717
(302) 831-1475

Steve Fesenmaier wrote:
> I wrote my own MLS thesis on "Film Selection Policies in Public
> Libraries" in 1979. One of the main conclusions was that few selection
> policies showed an awareness of film history. Years latter I had a
> letter published in American Libraries about a library film critic
> blasting one of my fav films, "WR: Mysteries of an Organism" by Dusan
> Makavejev. An editor at McFarland asked me to write a book on the
> visual illiteracy of librarians. I told him that librarians needed to
> watch more films, especially important classic and new ones, not read
> a book about their faults. At one time the National Video Resources (
> now called ReNew) person, Sally Mason, tried to help librarians
> become more visually literate. I don't know who is promoting visual
> literacy in our profession any more other than this listserv and
> related groups at ALA.
>
> If anyone would like to read my 50 page work on film selection
> policies, write me directly at - fesenms@wvlc.lib.wv.us. Steve Fesenmaier
>
>
> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
> issues relating to the selection, evaluation,
> acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current
> and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It
> is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for
> video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between
> libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.

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This is an interesting conversation...  I'd like to offer a glimmer of hope, with the caveat that I certainly agree that many librarians could use a boost in the media literacy department.  Things are certainly picking up as far as media is concerned, especially where new technologies are involved.  The Video Round Table's Digital Media Discussion Group has a session at every ALA midwinter meeting, and the attendance has jumped by leaps and bounds over the past few years.  The first year I attended was in 2005 and we had around ten folks.  In 2006, we had about 25 people and not nearly enough time to cover the topics that everyone wanted to discuss. This year, we had a larger room and a longer time slot; still not enough time and way too small of a room with over 70 attendees from academic, public, and school libraries, as well as vendors and filmmakers.  Major topics covered included new high definition market technologies, multimedia production in libraries, streaming of media resources, and video gaming in libraries.  Yes, the technological aspects receive more attention that the content at this point, but truly it's inseparable.  Media literacy is a huge topic and I'm glad to see that it's being discussed on this listserv -- I know it's something that VRT has talked about now and again for possible future programming ideas...

Best,

*************************
Meghann Matwichuk, M.S.
Senior Assistant Librarian
Instructional Media Collection Department
Morris Library, University of Delaware
181 S. College Ave.
Newark, DE 19717
(302) 831-1475



Steve Fesenmaier wrote:

I wrote my own MLS thesis on "Film Selection Policies in Public Libraries" in 1979. One of the main conclusions was that few selection policies showed an awareness of film history. Years latter I had a letter published in American Libraries about a library film critic blasting one of my fav films, "WR: Mysteries of an Organism" by Dusan Makavejev. An editor at McFarland asked me to write a book on the visual illiteracy of librarians. I told him that librarians needed to watch more films, especially important classic and new ones, not read a book about their faults. At one time  the National Video Resources ( now called ReNew)  person, Sally Mason,  tried to help librarians become more visually literate. I don't know who is promoting visual literacy in our profession any more other than this listserv and related groups at ALA.

If anyone would like to read my 50 page work on film selection policies, write me directly at - fesenms@wvlc.lib.wv.us. Steve Fesenmaier


VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.

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VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.