RE: [Videolib] Split betwen Audio and Visual?

James Scholtz (jimscholtz@sdln.net)
Wed, 11 Apr 2007 16:56:43 -0500

Hi Mike and everyone on Videolib - Jim Scholtz from Yankton, SD here.
Although I'm now a public library director I was an AV librarian in a couple
of different public libraries in the 80s and 90s and I'd like to give my
perspective in hopes that it may clarify/solidify your thinking. I was the
head of an AV Department in a couple of libraries as well as a state library
system. While there was an emphasis on the emerging format of VHS (and Beta
- can you believe it?!) format as well as laserdisc, we still collected AC
music, LPs and audiobooks (language cassettes, etc.) as well as art prints
ssculpture, etc. Personally, I don't think that there should be any
distinction concerning video and audio - meaning if a library has an AV
Dept. - it should have perview (i.e., the selection/collection development)
over ALL AV formats. Now, in today's world whether that means having
control over downloadable e-books, music, video, streamed video - rather
than letting the technology departments have them is the debate - is it the
format and delivery or the content that is important. In the past,
technology was left to the AV Depts - running a 16mm and 35mm projector -
heaven forbid negotiating a Sony U-matic or VHS recorder player.
Now-a-days, all of use/are overwhelmed by technology and I believe that
there is an even greater need for an AV Dept. in the public library which
should work in concert with other depts. - especially the technology dept
(mostly they are concerned with delivery, equipment and performance/Internet
access/printing, etc. - not collection development/selection). I believe
that format is still the driving force for patrons - just look at e-books -
Microsoft and Apple are still fighting over marketshare for e-format and
cross compatibility (will it ever happen).

So, my advise is to have a full-blown AV Roundtable - don't just limit
yourself to the video format. PLA has the Public Library AV section which
is more ecumenical in terms of AV discussions but, even at the ALA Video
Round Table, we discuss issues/technology having to do with broader topics
than just video. Just my 2 worth. Hope this helps. Jim Scholtz.

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
[mailto:owner-videolib@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of
MichaelMay.5652831@bloglines.com
Sent: Wednesday, April 11, 2007 2:20 PM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] Split betwen Audio and Visual?

My colleagues and I have been trying to establish a Video Round Table in
Iowa:

http://www.iowalibrarian.com/vrt/

Recently, I was asked why our efforts
are not including all A/V material, as traditionally done in the past. For
example, our state association had A/V committees and A/V sections from the
1960s to 1980s.

In the 2000s, I work with videos but not audio, I read
Video Librarian reviews, subscribe to VideoLib and VideoNews, and seek
guidance
from ALA's Video Round Table.

I thought maybe the increasing legitimacy
and accessibility of video collections in libraries from the 80s to the 00s
contributed to some sort of split between A and V. Does this make sense? Any
thoughts about this?

Thanks.

Mike in Dubuque
VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues
relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control,
preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and
related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective
working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication
between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and
distributors.

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.