Re: [Videolib] Buying at individual vs institutional price?

MichaelMay.5652831@bloglines.com
29 Mar 2007 23:10:48 -0000

Thanks for responses to my questions about DVD pricing.

This week I tried
to order One The Movie DVD from Lumen Naturae Promotions of Northville, MI
advertised online for $30:

http://www.onethemovie.org/Store/Movie.jsp

The invoice I received was for $100 for a "library-use" DVD. When I phoned
to complain, I was told that they had made a mistake on the invoice, and that
the price for libraries had recently dropped to $50. I canceled the order.

A few days later I phoned ABC News Store to ask why Bod Woodruff's Special
Report "To Iraq and Back" cost $89.95 for institutions and $29.95 for individuals:

http://www.abcnewsstore.com/

The customer service representative explained
that copies for institutions include PPR. I said my public library did not
need PPR, and asked if we could buy a copy for $29.95. The rep said my library
would still have to pay $89.95 because they could not guarantee that our patrons
would not use the DVD for public performances. I did not buy a copy.

Both
of these companies appear to be the exclusive distributors of these DVDs.
I could try interlibrary loan, but both titles are fairly new, and the Woodruff
DVD does not yet appear in WorldCat.

Considering the examples above, I'm
not inclined to pay higher prices as a way to "demonstrate support" for film
producers. I was hoping there might be some alternative means of buying these
DVDs at the best possible prices without resorting to illegal or unethical
behavior, but apparently there is not. No liability protection from VideoLib,
darn it!

This is not to say I'll resort to ethically dubious acquisition
practices, though I'm awfully tempted. No, I won't teach my kids to lie, but
I will try to impart unto them a certain wariness of institutional pricing,
along with a sense of humor.

Mike in Dubuque
VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.