[Videolib] academic libraries - - media on open shelves

Tobin Nellhaus (tobin.nellhaus@yale.edu)
Thu, 22 Mar 2007 16:24:40 -0400

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>From: = owner-videolib@lists.berkeley.edu =
>[mailto:owner-videolib@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Joanna Duy
>Sent: Thursday, March 22, = 2007 5:10 AM
>To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
>Subject: [Videolib] = academic libraries - - media on open shelves
>
>
>
>Hello-
>
>
>
>I am writing from Concordia University, a large academic university
>in Montreal, Canada. We are exploring = ways to make our media
>collections more browsable to users, and one thing we're considering
>is moving the collection (or some of it) into a publicly =
>accessible area (currently it's all behind a service desk; users
>have to come = and ask for a title).
>
>
>
>It would be great to hear from other academic = libraries that have
>media collections that are browsable and/or in "open = stacks". How
>does it work for you? What part of your collection is available in =
>this way? Are people able to use self-checkout machines to check out
>= materials? How do you secure media materials and do you know your
>loss rate? I know a = rather large number of public libraries shelve
>in open stacks, but I'm particularly interested to hear from
>academic libraries. =
>
>
>
>Thanks very much-
>
>Joanna Duy
>
>
>
>--
>Joanna Duy
>Head, Periodicals and Media Services
>Concordia University Libraries
>Webster Library, LB 345
>1400 de Maisonneuve West
>Montreal, = Quebec, Canada = H3G 1M8
>Phone: (514) 848-2424 ex. 7746
>E-mail: <3D.htm>joanna.duy@concordia.ca

Hi Joanna--

Yale moved media in the main library to open shelves about three
years ago. We have them in off-the-shelf translucent cases for
transport, and when on the shelf they're in transparent locking hard
shells ("Safers"), rather pricey but they don't bring all the hassles
and glitches of 3M tagging. Because of the locking mechanism,
self-checkout isn't feasible. Both the users and the staff have been
very satisfied, and to my knowledge there has been little or no
loss. (I'm reasonably likely to hear, since I headed the committee
that developed this system.) However, an important qualification:
little of the media in the main library consists of feature films and
shorts -- most of it is documentary. There's a separate Film Study
Center (which is not part of the library system) that carries the
bulk of the popular stuff. (Which, admittedly, didn't stop me from
getting all of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer"!)

Tobin Nellhaus
Librarian for Drama, Film and Theater Studies
226 Sterling Memorial Library, Yale University
130 Wall Street, P.O. Box 208240
New Haven, CT 06520-8240
Tel: 203/432-8212 Fax: 203/432-8527
tobin.nellhaus@yale.edu

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From: =3D owner-videolib@lists.berkeley.edu =3D [ mailto:owner-videolib@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Joanna Duy
Sent: Thursday, March 22, =3D 2007 5:10 AM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] =3D academic libraries - - media on open shelves

 

Hello-

 

I am writing from Concordia University, a large academic university in Montreal, Canada. We are exploring =3D ways to make our media collections more browsable to users, and one thing we=92re considering is moving the collection (or some of it) into a publicly =3D accessible area (currently it=92s all behind a service desk; users have to come =3D and ask for a title).

 

It would be great to hear from other academic =3D libraries that have med= ia collections that are browsable and/or in =93open =3D stacks=94. How does = it work for you? What part of your collection is available in =3D this way? Are people able to use self-checkout machines to check out =3D materials? How do you secure media materials and do you know your loss rate? I know a =3D rather large number of public libraries shelve in open stacks, but I=92m particularly interested to hear from academic libraries. =3D
 

Thanks very much-

Joanna Duy

 

--
Joanna Duy
Head, Periodicals and Media Services
Concordia University Libraries
Webster Library, LB 345
1400 de Maisonneuve West
Montreal, =3D Quebec, Canada =3D H3G 1M8
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ex. 7746
E-mail: joanna.duy@concordia.ca


Hi Joanna--

Yale moved media in the main library to open shelves about three years ago.  We have them in off-the-shelf translucent cases for transport, and when on the shelf they're in transparent locking hard shells ("Safers"), rather pricey but they don't bring all the hassles and glitches of 3M tagging.  Because of the locking mechanism, self-checkout isn't feasible.  Both the users and the staff have been very satisfied, and to my knowledge there has been little or no loss.  (I'm reasonably likely to hear, since I headed the committee that developed this system.)  However, an important qualification: little of the media in the main library consists of feature films and shorts -- most of it is documentary.  There's a separate Film Study Center (which is not part of the library system) that carries the bulk of the popular stuff.  (Which, admittedly, didn't stop me from getting all of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer"!)

Tobin Nellhaus
Librarian for Drama, Film and Theater Studies
226 Sterling Memorial Library, Yale University
130 Wall Street, P.O. Box 208240
New Haven, CT  06520-8240
Tel: 203/432-8212   Fax: 203/432-8527
tobin.nellhaus@yale.edu

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