Re: [Videolib] future of video collections

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Fri, 02 Mar 2007 12:55:36 -0800

Hi Lynn

You might dive back into the recent archives of videolib. This topic has
been bandied about lots in the last half year.

Earlier this week (or late last) I shot my mouth off re the challenges
regarding digital...(if you missed this screed, I can send it to you off
the list)

I think that some form of digital delivery is inevitable (and even
desirable)...but I think the shots are being frequently called by the wrong
people on campus. There seems to be a tension developing between teaching
needs and the folks on campus who support classroom technology and
libraries. Many of the vendors of VOD and digital media licenses are
pitching to IT guys who serve the immediate needs of faculty for classroom
content delivery...they're much less often pitching to librarians and
archivists on campus, who support some of the same needs, but who have
broader concerns: i.e. building and providing access to standing
collections of materials which are accessible by the larger campus
community. Many of the aforementioned vendors are selling systems that are
much more geared to on-the-fly digitization and short-term, limited access
than to the longer-term needs of library collection developers.

The issue I continue to be most concerned with (besides the quality of
images available in digital and the unsteady condition of digital standards
for video encoding and network delivery, and the problems with campus
network and classroom infrastructure, and...) is the currently wide
disparity between what's available to license and what's needed and heavily
used by our clients. When I take a look each morning at the DVDs and
videos that have been reserved for use in the classroom that day, it's very
(depressingly) apparent that very very few of these titles are available
either as "ready-made" files local mounting (or for remote access from a
third party server) or for licensing for in-house digitization. I think
that what's happening in some cases (as I mentioned in my last email) is
that there's a tendency for some faculty to use what's most sexily
deliverable., rather than what's best in terms of content.

We should all have the motto: "It's the CONTENT THAT COUNTS" tattooed on
our forearms...

Gary

At 11:47 AM 3/2/2007, you wrote:
>I wonder if folks would be willing to share their opinions on the future
>of video collections/av collections in academic libraries? How do you
>see the streaming of video and audio impacting collections?
>
>Quite a few vendors are offering multiple user access licenses and
>operations like Overdrive are becoming more and more popular. Penny for
>your thoughts.
>
>Thanks
>
>
>
>
>Lynn Kleindienst
>Coordinator of Library AV Services
>STCC Library
>One Armory Sq.
>Springfield, MA 01102
>413-755-4541
>
>VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
>issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
>control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in
>libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve
>as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of
>communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
>producers and distributors.

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"In societies where modern conditions of production prevail, all of life
presents itself as an immense accumulation of spectacles."

--Guy Debord

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.