Re: [Videolib] Collection going to IT????!!!!

Adrienne Howard (ahoward@pps.k12.or.us)
Mon, 26 Feb 2007 10:08:00 -0800

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I work for the biggest K-12 school district in Portland, Or. In our
case, UnitedStreaming (US) was purchased and implemented by our IT
department (IT) about 3 or 4 years ago, and I was told it was rather
inexpensive (for them). At the time, the streaming videos that were
offered was mostly the older United Learning content. Then IT came to
us and said that if we wanted to digitize the contents of our library,
they could host and deliver it through US. Well, we had to explain
that even if we were allowed to digitize our library that we would not
need US because we can stream material through our Medianet web catalog
and booking system.

However, I do not feel that UnitedStreaming is a joke. With Discovery
purchasing UnitedStreaming, the content is now a little richer, but I do
wish IT had waited. My budget for buying new material is ridiculously
low, but if I bag full of money I would be looking towards purchasing
digitized content from Schlessinger Media, Visual Learning Co. and Films
Media Group. If the content is good and relevant to the curriculum, it
shouldn't matter if it's on DVD, video or streaming video.

But I think what pains me the most is that some people feel that a
media library can easily be replaced by any inexpensive streaming video
service. I believe our IT department feels they can replace us, and
they release monthly statistics showing some very impressive usage of
UnitedStreaming at some schools. However, when pressed for more
information, we find that many students are registered to use US and
some schools regularly set up the computers in libraries so that kids
can view videos during lunch. I feel this is great for the kids; it's
better than YouTube and it's a good option for those kids that do not
have computers at home.

But this is not classroom, face to face instruction. The stats cannot
compare - apples and oranges. Our library was built over the years
from the ground-up by curriculum specialists, and now the growth of the
library is based on teacher suggestions and requests. Our library is a
true teachers' resource.

Not all IT departments are monolithic and make bad decisions. But if
your IT department makes a lot of assumptions and doesn't ask a lot of
questions, more than likely they also have the money to be dangerous.
:)






Adrienne Howard
Portland Public Schools
Multimedia Library - BESC/L2-30
503.916.3228
http://www-av.pps.k12.or.us ( http://www-av.pps.k12.or.us/ )

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I work for the biggest K-12 school district in Portland, Or.  In our case, UnitedStreaming (US) was purchased and implemented by our IT department (IT) about 3 or 4 years ago, and I was told it was rather inexpensive (for them).    At the time, the streaming videos that were offered was mostly the older United Learning content.  Then IT came to us and said that if we wanted to digitize the contents of our library, they could host and deliver it through US.   Well, we had to explain that even if we were allowed to digitize our library that we would not need US because we can stream material through our Medianet web catalog and booking system.
 
However, I do not feel that UnitedStreaming is a joke.  With Discovery purchasing UnitedStreaming, the content is now a little richer, but I do wish IT had waited.  My budget for buying new material is ridiculously low, but if I bag full of money I would be looking towards purchasing digitized content from Schlessinger Media, Visual Learning Co. and Films Media Group.  If the content is good and relevant to the curriculum, it shouldn't matter if it's on DVD, video or streaming video.
 
But I think what pains me the most is that some people feel that a media library can easily be replaced by any inexpensive streaming video service.  I believe our IT department feels they can replace us, and they release monthly statistics showing some very impressive usage of UnitedStreaming at some schools.  However, when pressed for more information, we find that many students are registered to use US and some schools regularly set up the computers in libraries so that kids can view videos during lunch.  I feel this is great for the kids; it's better than YouTube and it's a good option for those kids that do not have computers at home.
 
But this is not classroom, face to face instruction.  The stats cannot compare - apples and oranges.   Our library was built over the years from the ground-up by curriculum specialists, and now the growth of the library is based on teacher suggestions and requests.  Our library is a true teachers' resource. 
 
Not all IT departments are monolithic and make bad decisions.  But if your IT department makes a lot of assumptions and doesn't ask a lot of questions, more than likely they also have the money to be dangerous.  :)  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adrienne Howard
Portland Public Schools
Multimedia Library - BESC/L2-30
503.916.3228
http://www-av.pps.k12.or.us  --=__PartFCD85710.0__=-- VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.