RE: [Videolib] Re: videolib Digest V1 #193

Pasteur, Eric (EricPasteur@ppl.peoria.lib.il.us)
Wed, 14 Feb 2007 16:34:45 -0600

Although deg has very effectively explained the reasoning behind using a
rental service, I would like to add my thoughts.

Unlike in Gary's culinary analogy, library materials are the same regardless
of the source (unlike the pizzas). If needs are being met, I see no
philosophical difference between (a) renting copies for short-term use, or
(b) buying 20 copies, 17 of which will be sold in the book sale when initial
demand dies down. This is routine procedure for public libraries.
Fiscally, using a rental service is a possible alternative to purchase since
it could potentially save a huge chunk of the materials budget.

The short of it: Renting materials is a supplemental method of meeting
short-term demand that will ultimately have no bearing on the "permanent"
collection...and it has been used as a tool in public libraries long before
NetFlix came along.

Eric
_____________________________________
Eric Pasteur
Reference Services
Peoria Public Library
Peoria IL 61602
Tel 309.497.2145
Fax 309.674.0116
ericpasteur@ppl.peoria.lib.il.us
"Art is a lie which makes you realize the truth."
--Pablo Picasso

-----Original Message-----
From: Gary Handman [mailto:ghandman@library.berkeley.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, February 14, 2007 1:19 PM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Subject: Re: [Videolib] Re: videolib Digest V1 #193

Thanks for the clarification and reality check, deg. I dunno...still
seems like a crazy way to spend good budget money. I'm not a big fan of
ephemeral access...even for hot properties.

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley, CA 94720-6000
510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu

"You are looking into the mind of home video. It is innocent, it is
aimless,
it is determined, it is real" --Don DeLillo, Underworld

On Wed, 14 Feb 2007, deg farrelly wrote:

> Gary, Some public libraries have for quite some time provided a
pay-for-use
> service for some books in high demand.
>
> Instead of buying many multiple copies of best sellers, book rental plans
> allow for patrons who choose to do so to pay a daily fee. When the demand
> falls off, the library is not stuck with dozens of copies of the book.
>
> Libraries don't require patrons to rent; copies are still provided through
> the normal reserve lists at no charge for those who want to wait their
turn.
>
> In similar fashion, some libraries shorten the loan period for such books,
> and disallow renewal. A rental plan allows the borrower to keep the book
as
> long as s/he is willing to pay the daily fee.
>
> This is not a model that applies to the academic setting, where there are
> few spikes in demand for the same title. But in the public library
setting
> a rental model permits the library to provide patrons an alternative to
> purchasing the material outright.
>
> My $.02
>
> --
> deg farrelly, Associate Librarian
> Arizona State University at the West campus
> PO Box 37100
> Phoenix, Arizona 85069-7100
> Phone: 602.543.8522
> Email: deg.farrelly@asu.edu
>
>
> > Date: Wed, 14 Feb 2007 07:49:04 -0800
>
> >
> > Hmmm...interesting. I never, ever vaguely assume to speak for public
> > libraries or librarians (being the clueless academic that I am), but I
> > wonder how short-term rental to meet public demand fits in with the
> > service mandate and philosophy of libraries.
>
> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in
libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as
an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of
communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
producers and distributors.
>

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues
relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control,
preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and
related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective
working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication
between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and
distributors.
VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.