RE: [Videolib] Any Experience with Stakker Units for DVDs?

Grete Pasch (gpasch@ufm.edu.gt)
Thu, 8 Feb 2007 13:58:01 -0600

Yes, we have three similar units (150 disks each) manufactured by Dacal or
Ziotek (they come under various brand names). The units are tied into our
circulation system. DVD cases, for example, are barcoded with the DVD
accession number. When the circ staff scans the box's barcode, the unit
spits out the correct DVD - reverse process happens when the disk is
returned.

Very convenient, and no need to put security strips or circles on the disks.

-G

--
Grete Pasch - Directora, Recursos de Información Académica
www.biblioteca.ufm.edu - www.newmedia.ufm.edu
Universidad Francisco Marroquín, Guatemala

> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
> [mailto:owner-videolib@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Renee Zurn
> Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2007 11:50 AM
> To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Any Experience with Stakker Units for DVDs?
>
> Jared,
>
> This looks like an interesting solution for DVD storage. I
> hope someone has used it and will respond to your email. I
> am wondering how it would work at a public library.
>
> Renee
>
> Renee Zurn
> Manager, Adult Services
> Duluth Public Library
> 520 W. Superior St.
> Duluth, MN 55802
> 218/730-4240
>
>
> >>> "Seay, Jared Alexander" <SeayJ@cofc.edu> 2/7/2007 3:13 pm >>>
>
>
> Does anyone out there have any experience with the Disc Stakka? I
> get
> the details at
> www.imation.com/products/disc_stakka/index.html. But,
> basically a Disc Stakka is a device analogous to the old
> slide projector carrousel that stores, protects and retrieves
> optical data discs (DVD, CD etc.). One can connect a Stakker
> unit to a computer, install the database software, put up to
> 100 DVD/CD discs into, and then retrieve any specific title
> by calling it up from the database. The requested DVD is
> then ejected for use. Stakka units can be stacked up to five
> units high in a tower, thus the name. Up to 100 towers can
> be controlled by one computer.
>
>
>
> We are having trouble lately with having some of our DVD's
> stolen out of the case. The case is left on the shelf, but
> the disc or discs are missing. This was a small problem
> initially, but seems to be growing.
> We do not let our titles circulate, and students must view
> them in the Media Room. But, titles are still disappearing.
> We do not strip our discs or cases (though apparently the
> thieves believe the cases are so tagged).
>
>
>
> I know there are other security solutions out there, but I
> came across this Disc Stakka device, and it looks like it
> could go a long way toward solving our problem. Its
> basically the "Blockbuster solution" whereby the actual media
> is "behind the counter" and only the empty case is displayed.
> The Disc Stakka would seem to allow a minimum amount of
> space to be used for storing the discs and allow rapid
> retrieval and re-stocking (plus give a database of titles).
> I only know about it from the Disc Stakka site itself, and it
> sure sounds great. But, I wonder if
> anyone else has had any experience with it. What say yea?
>
>
>
> The site again is:
> http://www.imation.com/products/disc_stakka/index.html
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Jared A. Seay
>
> Reference Librarian
>
> Head, Media Collections
>
> Addlestone Library
> College of Charleston
>
> Charleston, SC 29424
>
>
>
> 843-953-1428
> seayj@cofc.edu
>
> www.cofc.edu/~seay
>
>
>
>
>
> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively
> discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation,
> acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of
> current and evolving video formats in libraries and related
> institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an
> effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a
> channel of communication between libraries,educational
> institutions, and video producers and distributors.
>

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.