Re: [Videolib] Tv copyright question + historic Tv

John Vallier (vallier@u.washington.edu)
Tue, 24 Oct 2006 09:09:04 -0700

Hello, Sarah and Videolibers:

You might find some (quasi)Public Domain or "open source" television
snippets on the Internet Archive, such as this odd East German dance
lesson: http://www.archive.org/details/East_German_Dance_Craze_1989
You can also search for "Open Source Movies" on the Internet Archive
here: http://www.archive.org/details/opensource_movies

Google Video hosts a number of movies from the National Archive and
Records Admin (NARA): http://video.google.com/nara.html Since these were
funded by the US Govt. they are most likely in the Public Domain. As
noted on NARA's website, "In general, all government records are in the
public domain and may be freely used" (http://www.archives.gov/faqs/).

And on the topic of television history, has the EU funded Birth of TV
project been mentioned on this list? "The BIRTH Television Archive (BTA)
is the World's first Internet archive of vintage [TV] from the early
times of European television." http://www.birth-of-tv.org/
Apologies if this site was already posted.

-John

--
John Vallier
Head of Multimedia Services
University of Washington Libraries Media Center
Box 353080, Seattle, Washington 98195-3080
http://www.lib.washington.edu/media/

M. Claire Stewart wrote: > Not an actual answer to your question, Sarah, but a recent article on a > closely related topic: > "Finding Murphy Brown: How Accessible are Historic Television Broadcasts?" > by Jeff Ubois > Journal of Digital Information, Vol 7, No 2 > <http://journals.tdl.org/jodi/article/view/jodi-177/155> > >> Hi- >> Is it possible that early television shows could already be in the >> public domain? Is there any source that lists movies/television shows >> that are in the public domain? >> >> As always, thanks! >> >> Sarah Andrews >> University of Iowa Libraries >> > >

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