Re: [Videolib] booking and ILL

Ciara Healy (cmhealy@waketech.edu)
Tue, 19 Sep 2006 16:09:53 -0400

Joanna,
My library consortium does not lend videos either via ILL or booking
but it has the capacity to do both. The ALA has a video round table that
has put forward these guidelines:
http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/pubguidelines/guidelinesinterlibrary.htm
covering interlibrary loan.

I am an advocate of ILL or booking for audiovisual formats and I hope
to get a chance to change the policy in my consortium. I had not thought
of booking as a possible avenue for lending videos! It seems a great
idea because within the booking function (SIRSI here) you can stipulate
the length of the loan and add in time for "transit" or processing or
whatever the term is. So the three day loan limit is moot within
booking. I would prefer that to ILL myself. Another reason booking may
be a better choice is that you do not have to hand over the videos to
the vicissitudes of ILL - you could manage the transport and timing.
Via ILL, presumably, patrons can initiate holds and the process is quite
automatic. I would like a little more control over videos than that.
Until lending gets too large and time consuming to manage each loan via
booking, I would prefer to use booking first and have ILL be the future
option. That way you can also weed out the casual (just for
entertainment) request at first - limit to just instructors or students
who need to use the item for research as a kind of pilot program. Then
once you assessed the demand, you could see how you want to open it up
and if the ILL would be a better option.

I make sure the instructors and students understand that the same rules
for viewing hold when the item is from another library. Here, students
can only view videos from the closed stacks if they watch them at one of
the viewing stations in the library. The same would be true for an item
lent from another library. Same with instructors - they have to be extra
careful of the item and return it asap. Usually they comply.

I currently advocate for loans on a case-by-case basis and am often
willing to lend. Right now, it is more like a network of favors - if I
lend I would like the favor returned when I need it. I usually only
honor requests for items that are needed by instructors and not
automatic hold or ILL requests placed by student or public users. There
are many steps between loans as favors on a case-by-case basis and
adding audiovisual materials to the ILL stream. Booking, I think is
about halfway between the two.

It is also the case that I do not have rare or super fragile items to
loan. But if I did, I would be reluctant to loan them using any system.
The whole project of ILL is great and I think it is a shame that more
libraries do not prefer to include their videos and dvds in the mix.
Yes, bad things will happen (I just had a two-vhs set of Saving Private
Ryan "go missing" from my office) but the good outweighs the bad I
think.

Good Luck!

Ciara

Ciara Healy
Media Services Librarian

Bruce I. Howell Library
Wake Technical Community College
9101 Fayetteville Road
Raleigh, NC 27603

(919) 773-4724
cmhealy@waketech.edu

>>> joanna.duy@concordia.ca 9/19/2006 2:51 pm >>>
Hello-


Our library (Concordia University, in Montreal) is currently examining
our procedures for lending videos to other libraries. We have two
"streams" - one is a booking stream, where another library books from
the library on our campus that has the item, and they promise to pay
courier fees and get it back to us within a reasonable time. The
second
stream is to allow loans of our videos through ILL. It is not always
clear through which stream people should be sent, and I'd like to look
at this issue and debate whether we should stream all external
requests
through booking, or through ILL, or whether it works best to have
these
two separate streams, or whether we should allow external lending of
videos at all.


Our video loan period is 3 days so one thing that's not so great about
ILL is that courier service is not always used and so the items are
kept
longer than the normal loan period, which is not very fair to our
users.


I'm wondering if I can hear from other academic library media centres
as
to a) whether they lend videos to other institutions and b) if so, do
these happen through an ILL office, or a booking system, or both? Do
you
have booking policies and if so do you have a different loan period
than
your normal video loan? For Canadian institutions, if you loan to
other
libraries, do you ask whether it's going to be shown in public and if
so
whether there is a license with ACF or Criterion?


Thanks very much for any input-

Joanna Duy


--
Joanna Duy
Head, Periodicals and Media Services
Concordia University Libraries
Webster Library, LB 345
1400 de Maisonneuve West
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1M8
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ex. 7746
E-mail: joanna.duy@concordia.ca <mailto:joanna.duy@concordia.ca> 

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