Re: [Videolib] Full length films on eReserve

Daisy Dominguez (daisilla@yahoo.com)
Fri, 15 Sep 2006 09:17:11 -0700 (PDT)

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Electronic reserves are usually password-protected so that only the students in your face-to-face instruction sessions can have access and you usually have to accept the copyright statement before moving on to the article. Does that make a difference, so long as you discard the digitized version after that semester? Also, isn't there a way to stream it (I'm not sure the term) where it will technically prevent someone from downloading it? I'm just checking...

Daisy

Jessica Rosner <jrosner@kino.com> wrote:
Well you canít digitize any copyrighted film without a license from the rights holder so I donít
think the method makes much difference.
I really donít know what if any licenses from studios allow this but then I am pretty far behind.
I gather there are some companies who have deals with some rights holders for downloading material
But I am kind of clueless that titles or types are available

I know that we donít even have these rights for much of our library so I couldnít license many of our titles if I wanted
To. Frankly I think this would go back to the same problem as PPR at universities. Since there are thousands
Of CRUCIAL titles ( Chaplin, Fassbinder whatever) you could never get rights on, it is a MESS
Technology is just way ahead of rights issues and I know a lot of cranky rights holders who may never
Agree to this

On 9/15/06 10:44 AM, "Sakarya, Mustafa" <MSakarya@mercy.edu> wrote:

Hello,

I hope some of you may have encountered this issue and can give our library some direction.

Is it legal to put a full length copyrighted film on electronic reserve for students to download? What if the film is streamed instead?

Thanks everyone for your help

Mustafa Sakarya
Head of Library Media Services
Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY

Proud Resident of a BLUE STATE

Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com
212-629-6880


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<div>Electronic reserves are usually password-protected so that only the students in your face-to-face instruction sessions can have access and&nbsp;you usually have to accept the copyright statement before moving on to&nbsp;the article. Does that make a difference, so long as you discard the digitized version after that semester? Also, isn't there a way to stream it (I'm not sure the term) where it will technically prevent someone from downloading it? I'm just checking...</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Daisy</div> <div><BR><B><I>Jessica Rosner &lt;jrosner@kino.com&gt;</I></B> wrote:</div> <BLOCKQUOTE class=replbq style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid"><FONT face="Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12px">Well you canít digitize any copyrighted film without a license from the &nbsp;rights holder so I donít <BR>think the method makes &nbsp;much difference.<BR>I really donít know what if any licenses &nbsp;from studios
allow this but then I am pretty far behind.<BR>I gather there are some companies who have deals with some rights holders for downloading material<BR>But I am kind of clueless that titles or types are available<BR><BR>I know that we donít even have these rights for much of our library so I couldnít license many of our titles if I wanted<BR>To. Frankly I think this would go back to the same &nbsp;problem as PPR at universities. Since there are thousands<BR>Of CRUCIAL titles &nbsp;( Chaplin, Fassbinder &nbsp;whatever) you &nbsp;could &nbsp;never get rights on, it is a MESS<BR>Technology is just way ahead of rights issues and I know a lot of cranky rights holders who may never<BR>Agree to this<BR><BR><BR><BR>On 9/15/06 10:44 AM, "Sakarya, Mustafa" &lt;MSakarya@mercy.edu&gt; wrote:<BR><BR></SPAN></FONT> <BLOCKQUOTE><FONT size=4><FONT face=Arial><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 13px">Hello,<BR>&nbsp;<BR>I hope some of you may have encountered this issue and can give our library some
direction.<BR>&nbsp;<BR>Is it legal to put a full length copyrighted film on electronic reserve for students to download? &nbsp;&nbsp;What if the film is streamed instead? &nbsp;&nbsp;<BR>&nbsp;<BR>Thanks everyone for your help<BR>&nbsp;<BR>Mustafa Sakarya<BR>Head of Library Media Services<BR>Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY<BR></SPAN></FONT></FONT><FONT face="Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12px"><BR></SPAN></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT face="Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12px"><BR><BR><BR><BR>Proud Resident of a BLUE STATE<BR>&nbsp;<BR>Jessica Rosner<BR>Kino International<BR>333 W 39th St. 503<BR>NY NY 10018<BR>jrosner@kino.com<BR>212-629-6880<BR></SPAN></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><BR><p>&#32;
<hr size=1>Get your email and more, right on the <a href="http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=42973/*http://www.yahoo.com/preview"> new Yahoo.com</a>

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VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.