Re: [Videolib] PPR

Jessica Rosner (jrosner@kino.com)
Tue, 12 Sep 2006 11:23:04 -0400

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I think this kind of thing is borderline in that it clearly violates the
copyright law but even studios
Are not likely to chase down folks showing it in their backyards to
neighbors ( except Disney) HOWEVER they will and have
Gone after larger types where it is say sponsored by a local community
organization, flyers are sent out
etc

On 9/12/06 10:57 AM, "Herownword@aol.com" <Herownword@aol.com> wrote:

> In a message dated 9/11/2006 8:16:51 PM Central Standard Time,
> cmhealy@waketech.edu writes:
>> http://www.mediainfocenter.org/story.asp?story_id=97634038
> I just looked at this article and realized that I must have read it in the
> (Madison) Wisconsin State Journal (which I read in addition to the NYT). But
> it does very clearly raise the issue of PPR and that sentence must have been
> in the WI version because that's the one I read earlier:
>
> "I INVITED SEVERAL families in our neighborhood and showed "The Muppet Movie"
> after sunset. As an experiment, I connected my laptop to the projector and,
> through a wireless Internet link, showed a favorite animated short, "Creature
> Comforts" that I found on AtomFilms.com (but not at my local Blockbuster). The
> Motion Picture Association of America says people must get licenses for
> "public" showings of movies, though in most cases they don't need one for home
> viewings with friends."
>
> Jocelyn Riley
> HerOwnWords.com
> NontraditionalCareers.com
>

Proud Resident of a BLUE STATE

Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com
212-629-6880

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Re: [Videolib] PPR I thi= nk this kind of thing is borderline in that it clearly violates the copyrigh= t law but even studios
Are not likely to chase down folks showing it in their backyards to neighbo= rs ( except Disney) HOWEVER they will and have
Gone after larger types where it is say sponsored by  a local communit= y organization, flyers are sent out
etc


On 9/12/06 10:57 AM, "Herownword@aol.com" <Herownword@aol.com&= gt; wrote:

In a message dated 9/11/2006 8:16:51 PM Central Standard Time, cmhealy@wake= tech.edu writes:
    http://www.mediainfocenter.org/story.asp?story_id=3D9763403= 8
I just looked at this article and realized that I must have read it in the= (Madison) Wisconsin State Journal (which I read in addition to the NYT). &n= bsp;But it does very clearly raise the issue of PPR and that sentence must h= ave been in the WI version because that's the one I read earlier:
 
"I INVITED SEVERAL families in our neighborhood and showed "The M= uppet Movie" after sunset. As an experiment, I connected my laptop to t= he projector and, through a wireless Internet link, showed a favorite animat= ed short, "Creature Comforts" that I found on AtomFilms.com (but n= ot at my local Blockbuster). The Motion Picture Association of America says = people must get licenses for "public" showings of movies, though i= n most cases they don't need one for home viewings with friends."
 
Jocelyn Riley
HerOwnWords.com
NontraditionalCareers.com





Proud Resident of a BLUE STATE
 
Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com
212-629-6880

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VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.