Re: [Videolib] Article about PPR for Campus Screenings?

Meghann Matwichuk (mtwchk@udel.edu)
Fri, 04 Aug 2006 16:32:54 -0400

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Lori,

I hope you'll share this tutorial when you are done. Sounds like it
will be a great resource!!

Best,

*************************
Meghann Matwichuk, M.S.
Senior Assistant Librarian
Instructional Media Collection Department
Morris Library, University of Delaware
181 S. College Ave.
Newark, DE 19717
(302) 831-1475

Lori Stevens wrote:

> I'll throw in my 2 cents for what it is worth. We have (at least
> since I have been here) licensed everything shown on campus. We have
> a copyright committee who develops policy for campus which is made up
> of faculty and staff, and I am in the process of creating a tutorial
> to be linked off the library homepage for faculty and students. What
> I am wishing for is a MPLC for colleges and universities that could
> offer an umbrella type license.
>
> Lori
>
> /4/2006 10:33 AM >>>
>
> In a message dated 8/4/06 11:37:05 AM, mtwchk@udel.edu writes:
>
>
>> Thanks to those who've offered replies! Dennis' comments in reply to
>> the original post, were, I think, what I was recalling. I will share
>> this discussion with the inquiree.
>
>
>
> My god, did I write something USEFUL? Must be another Dennis.
>
> What has suprised me over the past two years is how many longtime
> campus societies I've come across on the internet who I had thought
> disbanded, but actually turned to showing DVDs without permission.
> It's somewhat disheartening to write to some of these old "friends"
> (mostly professors, not librarians), asking them to properly license
> the film like they used to, and have them write back within minutes
> that they're cancelling the screening because they can't afford to pay
> for it. Which leads me to:
>
> 1) There are professors (and students) knowingly screening films
> illegally under the presumption that it's okay as long as they don't
> get caught. Only one college -- the University of Washington -- took
> these infractions seriously when they found out. As I've compared
> before, stealing a $50 text book from ! the college bookstore seems to
> be a far larger offense to most administrators.
>
> 2) Societies are willing to cancel even a scheduled screening because
> there's no money in the school's budget. (Or at least an unwillingness
> to fight for one.) Consider that the costs for renting a film
> nontheatrically has actually dropped (some drastically) over the past
> fifteen years while school budgets for the other arts and lectures, of
> course, have skyrocketed.
>
> 3) There needs to be continued discussions among the indie
> distributors (no one from Milestone could make the one meeting they
> had last year) what we can do to change the perception of the
> educational institutions and discover why these societies changed
> their policies on renting.
>
> The answer to all of these questions would be an interesting project
> for someone studying library s! cience. Anyone else have thoughts on
> these?
>
>
> Dennis ! Doros
> Milestone Film & Video / Milliarium Zero
> PO Box 128
> Harrington Park, NJ 07640
> Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
> Fax: (201) 767-3035
> milefilms@aol.com winterfilm@aol.com
> www.milestonefilms.com www.wintersoldierfilm.com
>
>
>
>
>
> Lori Stevens
> Media Librarian
> Utah Valley State College Library
> Orem, Utah 84058
>
> Buffy: "See, this is a school. And we have students
> and they check out books. And then they learn things."
>
> (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, 1997)
>

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Lori,

I hope you'll share this tutorial when you are done.  Sounds like it will be a great resource!!

Best,

*************************
Meghann Matwichuk, M.S.
Senior Assistant Librarian
Instructional Media Collection Department
Morris Library, University of Delaware
181 S. College Ave.
Newark, DE 19717
(302) 831-1475


Lori Stevens wrote:
I'll throw in my 2 cents for what it is worth.  We have (at least since I have been here) licensed everything shown on campus.  We have a copyright committee who develops policy for campus which is made up of faculty and staff, and I am in the process of creating a tutorial to be linked off the library homepage for faculty and students.  What I am wishing for is a MPLC for colleges and universities that could offer an umbrella type license.
 
Lori

/4/2006 10:33 AM >>>

In a message dated 8/4/06 11:37:05 AM, mtwchk@udel.edu writes:


Thanks to those who've offered replies!  Dennis' comments in reply to
the original post, were, I think, what I was recalling.  I will share
this discussion with the inquiree.


My god, did I write something USEFUL? Must be another Dennis.

What has suprised me over the past two years is how many longtime campus societies I've come across on the internet who I had thought disbanded, but actually turned to showing DVDs without permission. It's somewhat disheartening to write to some of these old "friends" (mostly professors, not librarians), asking them to properly license the film like they used to, and have them write back within minutes that they're cancelling the screening because they can't afford to pay for it. Which leads me to:

1) There are professors (and students) knowingly screening films illegally under the presumption that it's okay as long as they don't get caught. Only one college -- the University of Washington -- took these infractions seriously when they found out. As I've compared before, stealing a $50 text book from ! the college bookstore seems to be a far larger offense to most administrators.

2) Societies are willing to cancel even a scheduled screening because there's no money in the school's budget. (Or at least an unwillingness to fight for one.)
Consider that the costs for renting a film nontheatrically has actually dropped (some drastically) over the past fifteen years while school budgets for the other arts and lectures, of course, have skyrocketed.

3) There needs to be continued discussions among the indie distributors (no one from Milestone could make the one meeting they had last year) what we can do to change the perception of the educational institutions and discover why these societies changed their policies on renting. 

The answer to all of these questions would be an interesting project for someone studying library s! cience. Anyone else have thoughts on these?


Dennis ! Doros
Milestone Film & Video / Milliarium Zero
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
Fax: (201) 767-3035
milefilms@aol.com                winterfilm@aol.com
www.milestonefilms.com        www.wintersoldierfilm.com



 
 
Lori Stevens
Media Librarian
Utah Valley State College Library
Orem, Utah 84058
 
Buffy:  "See, this is a school.  And we have students
             and they check out books. And then they learn things."
 
              (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, 1997)
          

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