RE: [Videolib] Government agency films: need public performance licensing?

Milewski, Steven (smilewsk@utk.edu)
Thu, 3 Aug 2006 16:47:04 -0400

Hello,

The film "The Plow that the Plains" is available at
http://www.archive.org/details/plow_that_broke_the_plains It is in the
Prelinger Collection and claims to be in the public domain and there are
links to streaming. Does this mean Marilyn could use her tape, or could
she only used the streamed source, as the DVD she has may have "added
value" and be covered by copyright?

Steven

Steven Milewski
Lib. Sup.
Hodges Library
Media Center
smilewsk@utk.edu

end

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
[mailto:owner-videolib@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Marilyn Huntley
Sent: Thursday, August 03, 2006 1:44 PM
To: Videolib
Subject: [Videolib] Government agency films: need public performance
licensing?

Hello all,
A faculty member wants to sponsor a film series that will be advertised
in conjunction with our art gallery's exhibition of Depression-era WPA
art pieces. Some of the films were produced in the 1930's by agencies of
the U.S. government, and I'm trying to find out whether such films may
be freely shown, or if it's necessary to acquire public performance
licensing.

"The Plow That Broke the Plains," director Pere Lorenz, 1936, produced
by the Resettlement Administration. We own it in a DVD collection,
called "Our Daily Bread: and Other Films of the Great Depression." It's
also available for rent from Museum of Modern Art, as a 16mm film. Can
we legally advertise a showing of our DVD version, or must we rent the
film from MoMA?

"The River," director Pere Lorenz, 1937, produced by U.S. Farm Security
Administration. This, too, is in the DVD set, "Our Daily Bread," and
available as a 16mm film from MoMA. My question is the same as for "The
Plow" - our DVD or a rental from MoMA?

"The Land," director Robert Flaherty, 1942, produced by U.S. Film
Service and Agricultural Resettlement Administration. MoMA offers it for
rent as a 16mm film. That would be okay, but the professor is hoping it
exists somewhere on a DVD. Does anyone know of a DVD? And again, I have
that same question about whether we can legally show the DVD.

"Hands," director Ralph Steiner, 1934. This one was not produced by a
U.S. government agency, but by Niceville Pictures, Canada. It's
available from Amazon and Facets (and probably other sources) in a DVD
collection called "Unseen Cinema: Early American Avant Garde Film." It's
not listed in the MoMA catalog, and I haven't found it at any other
distributor who handles public performance licensing. Can we legally
show our DVD? Or, if we need a license, does anyone know of a source?

Thanks in advance for any information you can send me.
Marilyn Huntley

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Marilyn B. Huntley, Audiovisual Assistant:
Film scheduling, rentals, licensing & previews A-V Services, 408 C.
A. Johnson Hall Hamilton College, 198 College Hill Rd., Clinton, NY
13323 Phone 315-859-4120; Fax 315-859-4687 e-mail mhuntley@hamilton.edu

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in
libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve
as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel
of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
producers and distributors.

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.