[Videolib] Fwd: Digital Video Survey

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Thu, 20 Jul 2006 12:09:09 -0700

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>Found it...not too edifying, but here it is.

Gary

>Hi all...
>
>Well, the surveys are in...I'm going to try to summarize the gist of
>the rather varied responses...this ain't survey-taking at it's most
>precise, I gotta say, but it's rather interesting in a broad sort of way.
>
>Eleven institutions and one consortium (19 institutions) responded
>that they were involved in one way or another in some type of
>digital video projects and/or operations. Not surprisingly,
>perhaps, all 12 were academic, four year institutions. One
>reporting institution was from outside the US.
>
>The average number of commercially licensed titles currently
>accessible online seems to be somewhere between 10 and 30 (although
>the average number of titles actually licensed tends to be
>somewhat--sometimes considerably--higher) The spread reported for
>licensed titles currently being served up is between 6 and 1200 (!)
>
>Films Media Group is the most commonly reported content
>provider. Others include
>
>California Newsreel (2 institutions)
>PBS/WGBH (2 institutions)
>Media Education Foundation (2 institutions)
>Chip Taylor (2 institutions)
>Direct Cinema (1 institutions)
>Carousel (1 institutions)
>Documentary Educational Resources (1 institutions)
>Berkeley Media (1 institution)
>ArtMatten (1 institution)
>
>For FMG titles, only one institution reported providing access via
>FMG's server--the rest mount the files locally (or
>regionally). Except for the one institution mentioned, FMG users
>reported either buying FMG-encoded files or licensing the right to
>encode locally.
>
>Several institutions reported local digitization of
>commercially-produced content in course reserve/learning management
>system contexts under provisions of TEACH or fair use. Two
>institutions indicated the practice of digitizing and providing
>access to rare/unique or out of distribution titles (under Section
>108 provisions)
>
>Several institutions reported providing access to locally-produced
>digital video content (campus lectures, events, etc.). Content of
>this type seems to be largely produced by units outside the library.
>
>About half of the respondents limit access to specific courses (i.e.
>within an LMS shell). Only one or two institutions reported making
>content available beyond campus/institutional IP addresses over the internet.
>
>Digital format vary. 4 institutions are using mpeg4 (either solely
>or in addition to other formats). 3 institutions are using Windows
>Media (either solely or in addition to other formats). 3
>institutions are using Real (either solely or in addition to other
>formats). 2 institutions are using QuickTime (either solely or in
>addition to other formats). Flash was mentioned, but is apparently
>not currently in use by any of the repondents' institutions. One
>institution indicated experimenting with a java-based "playerless
>player" (Zentu).
>
>The majority of respondents indicated that digital titles were
>(mostly) represented in the campus OPAC. Three institutions
>indicated that digital titles were also accessible via separate web
>interfaces or databases.
>
>No real surprises... Think we're still at the dawn of the brave new age.
>
>Gary
>
>
>
>
>
>
>Gary Handman
>Director
>Media Resources Center
>Moffitt Library
>UC Berkeley
>ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
>http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC
>
>*****
>
>"In societies where modern conditions of production prevail,
> all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation
> of spectacles."
> --Guy Debord

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

*****

"In societies where modern conditions of production prevail,
all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation of
spectacles."
--Guy Debord
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Found it...not too edifying, but here it is.


Gary


Hi all...

Well, the surveys are in...I'm going to try to summarize the gist of the rather varied responses...this ain't survey-taking at it's most precise, I gotta say, but it's rather interesting in a broad sort of way.

Eleven institutions and one consortium (19 institutions) responded that they were involved in one way or another in some type of digital video projects and/or operations.  Not surprisingly, perhaps, all 12 were academic, four year institutions.  One reporting institution was from outside the US.

The average number of commercially licensed titles currently accessible online seems to be somewhere between 10 and 30 (although the average number of titles actually licensed tends to be somewhat--sometimes considerably--higher)  The spread reported for licensed titles currently being served up is between 6 and 1200 (!)

Films Media Group is the most commonly reported content provider.  Others include

California Newsreel  (2 institutions)
PBS/WGBH (2 institutions)
Media Education Foundation (2 institutions)
Chip Taylor (2 institutions)
Direct Cinema (1 institutions)
Carousel (1 institutions)
Documentary Educational Resources (1 institutions)
Berkeley Media (1 institution)
ArtMatten (1 institution)

For FMG titles, only one institution reported providing access via FMG's server--the rest mount the files locally (or regionally).  Except for the one institution mentioned, FMG users reported either buying FMG-encoded files or licensing the right to encode locally.

Several institutions reported local digitization of commercially-produced content in course reserve/learning management system contexts under provisions of TEACH or fair use.  Two institutions indicated the practice of digitizing and providing access to rare/unique or out of distribution titles (under Section 108 provisions)

Several institutions reported providing access to locally-produced digital video content (campus lectures, events, etc.).  Content of this type seems to be largely produced by units outside the library. 

About half of the respondents limit access to specific courses (i.e. within an LMS shell).  Only one or two institutions reported making content available beyond campus/institutional IP addresses over the internet.

Digital format vary.  4 institutions are using mpeg4 (either solely or in addition to other formats).  3 institutions are using Windows Media (either solely or in addition to other formats).  3 institutions are using Real (either solely or in addition to other formats).  2 institutions are using QuickTime (either solely or in addition to other formats).  Flash was mentioned, but is apparently not currently in use by any of the repondents' institutions.  One institution indicated experimenting with a java-based "playerless player" (Zentu).

The majority of respondents indicated that digital titles were (mostly) represented in the campus OPAC.  Three institutions indicated that digital titles were also accessible via separate web interfaces or databases.

No real surprises...  Think we're still at the dawn of the brave new age.

Gary






Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

*****

"In societies where modern conditions of production prevail,
           all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation of spectacles."
               --Guy Debord

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

*****

"In societies where modern conditions of production prevail,
           all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation of spectacles."
               --Guy Debord

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VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.