Re: [Videolib] Kinko's

Jessica Rosner (jrosner@kino.com)
Wed, 21 Jun 2006 11:51:04 -0400

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I believe the details of the decision made it clear that the problem was th=
e
copyright holders material was being copied
And they were not being compensated. It was of course easier to catch
something at a kinkos but the crux of the case
Was that material was being copies en masse without compensation. If the
prof makes copies of a whole article
Without permission the law would apply but it would be a lot harder to
catch.
The media equivalent would be say a school or commercial venue duping off
copies of a whole work without permission.
Again don=B9t really recall anyone disputing the notion that you can=B9t make
copies of media work without permission
Though there has been some discussion about what happens if said work is no
longer available and permission can not be
obtained

On 6/21/06 11:10 AM, "Herownword@aol.com" <Herownword@aol.com> wrote:

> I've been out of town and may have missed some of this discussion, but wd=
like
> to point out that the Kinko's decision involved copying for profit. The
> ultimate use for the readers Kinko's was producing were classroom student=
s,
> but Kinko's was making a profit from copying and distributing the readers=
. If
> an individual prof were to make copies of single articles for a particula=
r
> class and distribute them for free, I don't think copyright laws wd provi=
de
> much recourse. But of course no one wants to do that. Everyone, faculty=
and
> students alike, wants the convenience of having everything in a bound rea=
der
> and people are willing to pay for that. Kinko's may well be out of the c=
ourse
> reader business (not sure abt that), but universities in some cases have
> picked up the slack. Some universities have publishing offices that will
> obtain the rights and produce the readers. I've never heard of something
> similar for media rights, but it sounds like it wouldn't be a bad idea.
> =20
> Jocelyn Riley
> HerOwnWords.com
> NontraditionalCareers.com
>=20

Proud Resident of a BLUE STATE
=20
Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com
212-629-6880

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Re: [Videolib] Kinko's I bel= ieve the details of the decision made it clear that the problem was the copy= right holders material was being copied
And they were not being compensated. It was of course easier to catch somet= hing at a kinkos but the crux of the case
Was that material was being copies en masse without compensation. If the pr= of makes copies of a whole article
Without permission the law would apply but it would be a lot harder to catc= h.
The media equivalent would be say a school or commercial venue duping off c= opies of a whole work without permission.
Again don’t really recall anyone disputing the notion that you can= 217;t make copies of media work without permission
Though there has been some discussion about what happens if said work is no= longer available and permission can not be
obtained


On 6/21/06 11:10 AM, "Herownword@aol.com" <Herownword@aol.com&= gt; wrote:

I've been out of town and may have missed some of this discussion, but wd l= ike to point out that the Kinko's decision involved copying for profit. &nbs= p;The ultimate use for the readers Kinko's was producing were classroom stud= ents, but Kinko's was making a profit from copying and distributing the read= ers.  If an individual prof were to make copies of single articles for = a particular class and distribute them for free, I don't think copyright law= s wd provide much recourse.  But of course no one wants to do that. &nb= sp;Everyone, faculty and students alike, wants the convenience of having eve= rything in a bound reader and people are willing to pay for that.  Kink= o's may well be out of the course reader business (not sure abt that), but u= niversities in some cases have picked up the slack.  Some universities = have publishing offices that will obtain the rights and produce the readers.=  I've never heard of something similar for media rights, but it sounds= like it wouldn't be a bad idea.
 
Jocelyn Riley
HerOwnWords.com
NontraditionalCareers.com





Proud Resident of a BLUE STATE
 
Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com
212-629-6880

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