Re: [Videolib] Providing materials for faculty

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Mon, 12 Jun 2006 08:19:15 -0700

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Hello

If no one else will use the materials, they don't belong in a
standing collection. Collections should be carefully built rather
than serving as a passive dumping ground (I actually feel the same
about reserve collections, too). If it were me, I'd lobby for taking
this out of the library's loop: have the department pay for it and
be done with it.

When I took over this job (in the Early Mesolithic Era), one of the
first things I did was to convince the Council on Educational
Development to support the purchase of specialized/research video
thru their grant funding programs (if the material is very expensive,
I usually provide matching funds from my budget). The library is
actually written into the terms of the grant: CED provides the $ for
acquisition, but the material comes to the library. The faculty
person who wins the grant has to check out the stuff just like everyone else.

Gary Handman

At 07:33 AM 6/12/2006, Moshiri, Farhad wrote:
>Dear colleagues,
>
>As a new comer to this list, I'm sure you've addressed this issue
>before. But I highly appreciate if you post your ideas again. One of
>our problems is providing materials to faculty for their personal
>research. We have purchased expensive materials in the past that
>have no relations to the courses at the university. The problem is
>that when they leave the university, we end up with expensive
>materials no one else use. What is your policy? How far do you go
>providing materials for your faculty?
>
>Farhad Moshiri,
>AV Librarian
>University of the Incarnate Word
>San Antonio, TX

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

*****

"In societies where modern conditions of production prevail,
all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation of
spectacles."
--Guy Debord
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Hello

If no one else will use the materials, they don't belong in a standing collection.  Collections should be carefully built rather than serving as a passive dumping ground (I actually feel the same about reserve collections, too).  If it were me, I'd lobby for taking this out of the library's loop:  have the department pay for it and be done with it.

When I took over this job (in the Early Mesolithic Era), one of the first things I did was to convince the Council on Educational Development to support the purchase of specialized/research video
thru their grant funding programs (if the material is very expensive, I usually provide matching funds from my budget).  The library is actually written into the terms of the grant:  CED provides the $ for acquisition, but the material comes to the library.  The faculty person who wins the grant has to check out the stuff just like everyone else. 

Gary Handman

At 07:33 AM 6/12/2006, Moshiri, Farhad wrote:

Dear colleagues,
 
As a new comer to this list, I=92m sure you=92ve addressed this issue bef= ore. But I highly appreciate if you post your ideas again. One of our problems is providing materials to faculty for their personal research. We have purchased expensive materials in the past that have no relations to the courses at the university. The problem is that when they leave the university, we end up with expensive materials no one else use. What is your policy? How far do you go providing materials for your faculty?
 
Farhad Moshiri,
AV Librarian
University of the Incarnate Word
San Antonio, TX

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

*****

"In societies where modern conditions of production prevail,
           all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation of spectacles."
            &= nbsp;  --Guy Debord

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VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.