Re: [Videolib] question on copyrights

MileFilms@aol.com
Wed, 22 Feb 2006 11:11:02 EST

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In a message dated 2/22/06 9:56:31 AM, albrechs@wabash.edu writes:

> I think the question, though, Jessica, is why is it WORSE to stream a film
> **that the institution owns** and then password protect it and make it
> available to only a particular class of students, than it would be to have
> it on reserve?=A0
>=20

My main concern would be that this is in no way protects the film from theft=
.=20
One posting on a website with a log-in name and the password would at least=20
open it to the whole campus, if not the whole world. Considering you can=20
download just about any movie in the world for free -- even a day or two aft=
er=20
release -- if you lack ethics and have a desire to do so, is an argument for=
and=20
against my point, so it's certainly open for discussion. Streaming to a=20
classroom or particular site is a different point as well.

There's a point not being considered here, of course. There are many=20
educational films that are not being rampantly copied and bootlegged because=
, frankly,=20
there's a lack of desire by the public. Sadly, many of Milestone's own=20
feature films fall under this catagory as well. ;-) But you can't separate=
the=20
two kind of films by law, because who's to say what somebody wants to steal=20=
or=20
not.

Honestly, Kino, New Yorker, Milestone and the others have films that are=20
widely bootlegged (anyone want to buy the restored Metropolis or Tabu for a=20=
$1=20
from a Hong Kong bootleg company?) and it cuts deeply into business.=20

Though it might not make sense to the institutions, companies -- especially=20
with these kind of films -- should vigorously protect their rights and=20
platforms as policy. You can't allow it as a general rule (buy our copy and=20=
put it on=20
your website with password protection) because then the "University of Jacks=
on=20
Heights Video" can do the same and charge their "students" $5 a year to stud=
y=20
any video in their webstore, uh, campus. And as the recent sports scandals=20
show, anybody can be a legit institution.

Just playing devil's advocate...

Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
Fax: (201) 767-3035
Email: milefilms@aol.com
Website: http://www.milestonefilms.com

"Welcome to New Jersey.
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0Big Hair, Big Heart, Big Fun!"
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0- Amy Heller

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In a message dated 2/22/06 9:56:31 AM, albrechs@wabash.edu writes:


I think the question,= though, Jessica, is why is it WORSE to stream a film
**that the institution owns** and then password protect it and make it
available to only a particular class of students, than it would be to have it on reserve?=A0


My main concern would be that this is in no way protects the film from th= eft. One posting on a website with a log-in name and the password would at l= east open it to the whole campus, if not the whole world. Considering you ca= n download just about any movie in the world for free -- even a day or two a= fter release -- if you lack ethics and have a desire to do so, is an argumen= t for and against my point, so it's certainly open for discussion. Streaming= to a classroom or particular site is a different point as well.

There's a point not being considered here, of course. There are many educati= onal films that are not being rampantly copied and bootlegged because, frank= ly, there's a lack of desire by the public.  Sadly, many of Milestone'= s own feature films fall under this catagory as well. ;-)  But you can= 't separate the two kind of films by law, because who's to say what somebody= wants to steal or not.

Honestly, Kino, New Yorker, Milestone and the others have films that are wid= ely bootlegged (anyone want to buy the restored Metropolis or Tabu for a $1=20= from a Hong Kong bootleg company?) and it cuts deeply into business.

Though it might not make sense to the institutions, companies -- especially=20= with these kind of films --
should vigorously protect their rig= hts and platforms as policy. You can't allow it as a general rule (buy our c= opy and put it on your website with password protection) because then the "U= niversity of Jackson Heights Video" can do the same and charge their "studen= ts" $5 a year to study any video in their webstore, uh, campus. And as the r= ecent sports scandals show, anybody can be a legit institution.

Just playing devil's advocate...

Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
Fax: (201) 767-3035
Email: milefilms@aol.com
Website: http://www.milestonefilms.com

"Welcome to New Jersey.
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0Big Hair, Big Heart, Big Fun!"
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0- Amy Heller
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