Re: [Videolib] DVD-R -- not a stable format

MileFilms@aol.com
Fri, 17 Feb 2006 11:52:06 EST

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Here's my perspective as a distributor who just got into DVD-R last year for
our smaller titles. I will be the first to admit that there are inherent
problems with the technology and say that I don't particularly like them. We
include instructions in the case or on the back explaining the difference between a
DVD-R and a DVD that strongly encourages everyone to play the DVD-R on the
machine that will be used ahead of time to make sure it's compatable with the
player. On important playdates with our new releases, I tend to provide a DVD-R
and a DVD+R as backup.

DVD-Rs only exist because a) they're cheaper to produce and b) libraries and
educators prefer DVDs in whatever format over VHS tapes. It's getting back to
Gary's theory about new technologies. And admitedly, when done right and
depending on the source material, DVD-Rs do look better than tape.

I'd say "home produced" DVD-Rs (those burned on replicators or computers at
the distributor) have a 5% to 20% failure rate, which is way too much. The
DVD-Rs that come straight from the lab with more sophisticated machinery, seems to
have less failures.

Of course, anytime there's a failed DVD-R, we replace it immediately and I
suspect other companies do as well. And we are continuously investigating ways
to provide real DVDs for new nontheatrical titles at an economical cost, and
though that time hasn't come yet, it should soon. Especially when the studios
start going over to HD-DVD and the small replicators get desperate for standard
DVD work.

We also established a policy for those who bought a DVD-R from us for
institutional rates (such as WINTER SOLDIER), where we will be shipping the standard
DVDs out automatically to those people when they are printed for the home
video market. I hope other distributors consider this.

Hopefully, DVD-Rs will be a temporary format before a better one comes along.
Most of our DVD-Rs of our older titles cost $29.95 to $39.95 to purchase
(without PPR) as we have a different model for our company.

Unless they come with a free replacement guarantee at any time (they are even
more prone to scratches and fingerprints than DVDs), I don't think they're
worth buying over a VHS. Not yet.

Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
Fax: (201) 767-3035
Email: milefilms@aol.com
Website: http://www.milestonefilms.com

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Here's my perspective as a distributor=20= who just got into DVD-R last year for our smaller titles. I will be the firs= t to admit that there are inherent problems with the technology and say that= I don't particularly like them. We include instructions in the case or on t= he back explaining the difference between a DVD-R and a DVD that strongly en= courages everyone to play the DVD-R on the machine that will be used ahead o= f time to make sure it's compatable with the player. On important playdates=20= with our new releases, I tend to provide a DVD-R and a DVD+R as= backup.

DVD-Rs only exist because a) they're cheaper to produce and b) libraries and= educators prefer DVDs in whatever format over VHS tapes. It's getting back=20= to Gary's theory about new technologies. And admitedly, when done right and=20= depending on the source material, DVD-Rs do look better than tape.

I'd say "home produced" DVD-Rs (those burned on replicators or computers at=20= the distributor) have a 5% to 20% failure rate, which is way too much. The D= VD-Rs that come straight from the lab with more sophisticated machinery, see= ms to have less failures.

Of course, anytime there's a failed DVD-R, we replace it immediately and I s= uspect other companies do as well. And we are continuously investigating way= s to provide real DVDs for new nontheatrical titles at an economical cost, a= nd though that time hasn't come yet, it should soon. Especially when the stu= dios start going over to HD-DVD and the small replicators get desperate for=20= standard DVD work.

We also established a policy for those who bought a DVD-R from us for instit= utional rates (such as WINTER SOLDIER), where we will be shipping the standa= rd DVDs out automatically to those people when they are printed for the home= video market. I hope other distributors consider this.

Hopefully, DVD-Rs will be a temporary format before a better one comes along= . Most of our DVD-Rs of our older titles cost $29.95 to $39.95 to purchase (= without PPR) as we have a different model for our company.

Unless they come with a free replacement guarantee at any time (they are eve= n more prone to scratches and fingerprints than DVDs), I don't think they're= worth buying over a VHS. Not yet.

Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
Fax: (201) 767-3035
Email: milefilms@aol.com
Website: http://www.milestonefilms.com
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