Re: [Videolib] RE: Insight Media's policy on digitization and

Jerry Notaro (notaro@stpt.usf.edu)
Tue, 14 Feb 2006 16:17:34 -0500

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> Here's what I'm concerned about (well, one thing among many many many
> things)...
>=20
> One of my favorite classical allusions (pardon me if I've already flung t=
his
> one out...) is the story of Procustes...nasty thuggy guy who invited
> travellers into his home, let them sleep on a tiny little bed...in middle=
of
> nite, cut off their heads and feet to match the size of the bed...
>=20
> What's this have to do with streamed media? Wellllllll....
>=20
> You got a large content universe that is used in diverse ways by a divers=
e
> clientele. You got a teeeeeny little part of that universe that is avail=
able
> in a gee-whiz form of delivery (an expensive form of delivery, at that). =
I
> have a strong feeling that there's gonna be a lot of head-and-feet loppin=
g off
> going on...all (and only) the media that's fit to stream.
>=20
> The fact of the matter is (with profound apologize to my many colleagues =
and
> friends on the distribution side...you know I love you!): when I look at=
the
> range of titles in my collection that are typically screened in class or
> assigned for viewing outside of class over the course of a semester, very=
few
> (and I mean VERY few) are titles from distributors that offer digital rig=
hts
> (or are likely to offer such rights in the near future). If use or proj=
ected
> use of titles is the key benchmark in determining which rights to buy, we=
've
> got problems, Huston...
>=20
> I'm not willing (and probably wouldn't be able) to go down the Procustes
> road...trying to cut classroom and research need to fit the size of the
> digital bed. Scoring rights and going thru the effort to digitize materi=
als
> in vague anticipation of need or use just ain't gonna cut it, either...
>=20
Anyone else?

I=B9ll bite. Let me give an historical analogy which directly involved media.
Many of you remember when media did not circulate, were not cataloged, and
were not classified. Schools were among the first to tackle treating media
the same as books, though we didn=B9t have the help to do all that processing=
.
Many school media specialists only ordered those titles that came classifie=
d
and with catalog cards. Some, like Demco, even put them in boxes and would
deliver them fully processed. Those titles soon became the best selling, no=
t
necessarily because they were the best for the situation, but because of ho=
w
they were delivered. Granted, not an exact analogy, but historically
accurate.

Jerry, loving this discussion

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Re: [Videolib] RE: Insight Media's policy on digitization and stream= ing- comments on 4 references

Here's what I'm concerned about (well, one thing among many many many= things)...

One of my favorite classical allusions (pardon me if I've already flung thi= s one out...) is the story of Procustes...nasty thuggy guy who invited trave= llers into his home, let them sleep on a tiny little bed...in middle of nite= , cut off their heads and feet to match the size of the bed...

What's this have to do with streamed media?  Wellllllll....

You got a large content universe that is used in diverse ways by a diverse = clientele.  You got a teeeeeny little part of that universe that is ava= ilable in a gee-whiz form of delivery (an expensive form of delivery, at tha= t).  I have a strong feeling that there's gonna be a lot of head-and-fe= et lopping off going on...all (and only) the media that's fit to stream.

The fact of the matter is (with profound apologize to my many colleagues an= d friends on the distribution side...you know I love you!):  whe= n I look at the range of titles in my collection that are typically screened= in class or assigned for viewing outside of class over the course of a seme= ster, very few (and I mean VERY few) are titles from distribut= ors that offer digital rights (or are likely to offer such rights in the nea= r future).   If use or projected use of titles is the key benchmar= k in determining which rights to buy, we've got problems, Huston...  
I'm not willing (and probably wouldn't be able) to go down the Procustes ro= ad...trying to cut classroom and research need to fit the size of the digita= l bed.  Scoring rights and going thru the effort to digitize materials = in vague anticipation of need or use just ain't gonna cut it, either...

Anyone else?

I’ll bite. Let me give an historical analogy which directly involved = media. Many of you remember when media did not circulate, were not cataloged= , and were not classified. Schools were among the first to tackle treating m= edia the same as books, though we didn’t have the help to do all that = processing. Many school media specialists only ordered those titles that cam= e classified and with catalog cards. Some, like Demco, even put them in boxe= s and would deliver them fully processed. Those titles soon became the best = selling, not necessarily because they were the best for the situation, but b= ecause of how they were delivered. Granted, not an exact analogy, but histor= ically accurate.

Jerry, loving this discussion

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