RE: [Videolib] Public Library DVD Policies

Jaeschke, Myles (mjaesch@tulsalibrary.org)
Fri, 20 Jan 2006 09:00:30 -0600

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Hi Blaine---
See my answers below...
=20
Tulsa City County Library serves a population of 500,000. We have 23
branches, 4 of these are regional libraries and of course Central
library. Our 4 regional libraries and central library stock feature
films. We have been using Triple III for some time here. It does have
some limitations, but overall works very well. =20

--For a typical feature film DVD release, how do you determine the
number of copies you order?=20
This depends--If it is a big release we buy 10 (2 for each location). A
"catalog" title anywhere from 1 to 5.=20
=20
--Do you take patron reserves for your DVDs?=20
Yes--Triple I make reserves very easy. Although, the hold can really
pile up on popular titles.=20
=20
--If you take reserves, how do you determine when additional copies are
necessary for purchase?=20
We like to a 6:1 to 8:1 ratio for films. However the maximum copies of
any adult feature film we buy is 10.=20
=20
--What is your loan period for DVDs?=20
7 days with an opportunity of a renewal if there are no existing holds.=20
=20
--What is the limit on checkouts of DVD?=20
5 DVDs per card=20
=20
My current situation: We are in the process of changing over to a new
system (Triple I Millennium), and are consequently reevaluating various
policies with this transition. We do not take reserves on feature film
releases (but we do on just about everything else, including
documentaries and foreign language titles) with a two-day loan period
and a limit of three DVDs at a time. They circulate for free.
Genrerally, my materials budget is not an issue...I can usually purchase
what I need when I need it. =20
=20
In order to bring the feature film DVDs in line with most of the other
materials in the library, I would like to see us begin taking reserves
on them. This would have the benefit to the customer in that they would
now have a better handle on when they will be able to view a specific
title (much the way they do on current print bestsellers). If the wait
is too long for them, they could explore other options for obtaining the
film (renting it, purchasing it). As it stands now, the chances of a
customer finding a specific current DVD title on the shelf at any
specific time is completely random, which can be frustrating. Taking
reserves would also benefit the customer in that they would learn to use
the new online catalog, and could place the reserves from their own home
(or we could do it for them, of course!). Can you think of any other
benefits? =20
=20
When you purchase "hot" titles will they hit you catalog upon order or
upon circulation? We allow ours titles to be searched while on order.
Customers may place holds on items that have not yet been received yet
or haven't made it to street date. Keep this in mind if you decide to
take reserves, and purchase accordingly.
=20
We are also looking at standardizing the loan period for DVDs...as I
mention above, feature film titles currently circulate for two days,
while series, exercise, and some educational and other non-fiction
titles circulate for a week. We are looking at changing all to a three
or four day period, while increasing the limit to six. This should
offset any circulation drop due to the reserving of titles. Is this
logical?=20
Yes, we did this sometime ago. =20
=20
Any other suggestions/arguments I could use in my presentation regarding
this issue would be most helpful. =20
=20
Best regards,
Myles Jaeschke
=20
Tulsa City-County Library
Media Center
=20

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Hi Blaine---
See my answers below...
 
Tulsa City County Library = serves a=20 population of 500,000.  We have 23 branches, 4 of these are = regional=20 libraries and of course Central library.  Our 4 regional=20 libraries and central library stock feature films.   We have been using Triple III for some = time=20 here.  It does have some limitations, but overall works very = well. =20
--For a=20 typical feature film DVD release, how do you determine the number of = copies you=20 order? 
This depends--If it is = a big=20 release we buy 10 (2 for each location).  A "catalog" title = anywhere=20 from 1 to 5. 
 
--Do you take=20 patron reserves for your DVDs? 
Yes--Triple I make = reserves=20 very easy.  Although, the hold can really pile up on popular=20 titles. 
 
--If you take=20 reserves, how do you determine when additional copies are necessary for=20 purchase? 
We like to a 6:1 to 8:1 = ratio for=20 films.  However the maximum copies of any adult feature film = we buy is=20 10. 
 
--What=20 is your loan period for DVDs? 
7 days with an = opportunity of=20 a renewal if there are no existing=20 holds. 
 
--What is the=20 limit on checkouts of DVD? 
5 DVDs per=20 card 
 
My = current=20 situation:  We are in the process of changing over to a new system = (Triple=20 I Millennium), and are consequently reevaluating various policies with = this=20 transition.  We do not take reserves on feature film releases (but = we do on=20 just about everything else, including documentaries and foreign language = titles)=20 with a two-day loan period and a limit of three DVDs at a time.  = They=20 circulate for free.  Genrerally, my materials budget is not an = issue...I can usually purchase what I need when I need it. =20
 
In order to=20 bring the feature film DVDs in line with most of the other materials in = the=20 library, I would like to see us begin taking reserves on them.  = This would=20 have the benefit to the customer in that they would now have a better = handle on=20 when they will be able to view a specific title (much the way they do on = current=20 print bestsellers).  If the wait is too long for them, they = could=20 explore other options for obtaining the film (renting it, purchasing = it). =20 As it stands now, the chances of a customer finding a specific current = DVD title=20 on the shelf at any specific time is completely random, which can be=20 frustrating.  Taking reserves would also benefit the = customer in that they would learn to use the new online catalog, = and could=20 place the reserves from their own home (or we could do it for them, of=20 course!).  Can you think of any other benefits?  
 
When you purchase "hot" titles = will they=20 hit you catalog upon order or upon circulation?  We allow ours = titles to be=20 searched while on order.  Customers may place holds on items that = have not=20 yet been received yet or haven't made it to street date.  Keep this = in mind=20 if you decide to take reserves, and purchase=20 accordingly.
 
We are also=20 looking at standardizing the loan period for DVDs...as I mention above, = feature=20 film titles currently circulate for two days, while series, exercise, = and some=20 educational and other non-fiction titles circulate for a week.  We = are=20 looking at changing all to a three or four day period, while increasing = the=20 limit to six.  This should offset any circulation drop due to = the=20 reserving of titles.  Is this logical? 
Yes, we did this = sometime=20 ago.   
 
Any other=20 suggestions/arguments I could use in my presentation regarding this = issue would=20 be most helpful.   
 
Best=20 regards,
Myles=20 Jaeschke
 
Tulsa City-County=20 Library
Media=20 Center
 
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