Re: [Videolib] streaming media and academic libraries: the future?

Mark Richie (n2books@frontiernet.net)
Fri, 16 Dec 2005 22:14:25 -0600

And SAFARI MONTAGE Digital Video on Demand system from Library Video
Company. www.safarimontage.com. with another couple of hundred titles
for IP delivery.

MLR

Mark Richie wrote:

> OK Gary, so from a K-12 perspective perhaps the term "academic" is too
> broad a word- but from the lowly view of us K-12 types how about
> United Streaming/Learning (now Discovery streaming), Films
> Incorporated, some BFA titles, Visual Learning Corp, Bullfrog, Media
> Inc titles, Films for the Humanities, AGC, AIMS Media (now with
> Discovery Streaming), Classroom Video, . . . I'll think of a couple
> of others in a minute. A couple of thousand titles is significant to
> me at least.
>
> In general, most educational video distributors will at least work
> with you if you want streaming and/or download distribution rights for
> their products. In an open system like Cisco, or iDVS, it makes it
> fairly easy to populate your server with specific titles tailored to
> client needs. Producers can say "no way" or "sure, for X dollars
> under these conditions" or "we'll get back to you" - or "we have no
> idea what you are talking about . . ." All you have to do is ask.
>
> Mark
>
>
> Gary Handman wrote:
>
>> "significant number of academic title are already available for IP
>> distribution"
>>
>> Media Education foundation, Films Media Group, and a chunk of PBS
>> titles...that's it, Mark...unless you know something that I don't
>>
>> Gary
>>
>>
>> At 04:24 PM 12/10/2005, you wrote:
>>
>>> Hi Maureen and All - Interesting that the faculty does not want
>>> video resources to be circulated out-of-house to students. Who gets
>>> to make circulation policy? Does the faculty get decision making
>>> rights for which books can be checked out and which can't? Hmmmmm .
>>> . . .
>>>
>>> And for your boss . . . five years? She must mean five years AGO . .
>>> . past tense. Our first video over IP server went up in December
>>> 1999 for full motion, full screen video on demand in a K-12 regional
>>> service center. Streaming video became widely available from several
>>> vendors by 2001. Some offer the cost per viewing model. Some offer
>>> servers and software and let you load your own content and build
>>> your own metadata catalog.
>>>
>>> In a campus setting video on demand systems make a lot of sense.
>>> Faculty should be able to assign video to watch in preperation for a
>>> lecture or lab and students should be able to see it in their dorms
>>> (or off campus on anything but a dial up connection).
>>>
>>> And, no, Video collections will not cease to exist IMHO. Mostly
>>> because you will never get digital distribution (read streaming)
>>> rights to EVERY title in an academic video collection. Social issue
>>> docs, some features, out of print, rare titles, unknown rights
>>> holders, exorbitant fees and assorted other issues detailed by
>>> others on the list will keep many titles off line and in physical
>>> media only.
>>> But a significant number of academic title are already available for
>>> IP distribution and universities could easily begin to make the
>>> shift to non-physical video access. Other than money, the down side
>>> to the shift is breaking old habits of faculty in using video as
>>> powerful support tool for the learning process.
>>>
>>> Mark Richie
>>> Xmedia2@frontiernet.net
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Maureen Tripp wrote:
>>>
>>>> Some of you may recall that I wanted to begin circulating our video
>>>> resources to students--currently they circulate to faculty only,
>>>> and students must use them inhouse. Well, that proposal has been
>>>> soundly rejected by the faculty. When I said I wanted to continue
>>>> to press for this, my boss told me that streaming media will soon
>>>> render the issue moot. "In five years," she told me, "streaming
>>>> video will change the entire way academic media resources will
>>>> operate."
>>>>
>>>> Okay, I'd like to tap the collective wisdom of the list re this
>>>> statement:
>>>> 1. Five years?
>>>> 2. Will video resource collections cease to exist?
>>>> 3. And on a practical level, is anyone out there using streaming
>>>> video as part of a Media Resources collection--if so, how
>>>> useful/effective is it?
>>>> As always, thanks for your input!
>>>>
>>>> Maureen Tripp
>>>> Media Librarian
>>>> Media Services Center
>>>> 180 Tremont St. 3rd Floor
>>>> Boston, MA 02116
>>>> maureen_tripp@emerson.edu
>>>> (617)824-8676
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
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>>>>
>>>>
>>>
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>>
>>
>>
>> Gary Handman
>> Director
>> Media Resources Center
>> Moffitt Library
>> UC Berkeley
>> ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
>> http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC
>>
>> *****
>>
>> "In societies where modern conditions of production prevail,
>> all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation of
>> spectacles."
>> --Guy Debord
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>
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