Re: [Videolib] streaming media and academic libraries: the future?

Mark Richie (n2books@frontiernet.net)
Sat, 10 Dec 2005 18:24:03 -0600

Hi Maureen and All - Interesting that the faculty does not want video resources to be circulated out-of-house to students. Who gets to make circulation policy? Does the faculty get decision making rights for which books can be checked out and which can't? Hmmmmm . . . .

And for your boss . . . five years? She must mean five years AGO . . . past tense. Our first video over IP server went up in December 1999 for full motion, full screen video on demand in a K-12 regional service center. Streaming video became widely available from several vendors by 2001. Some offer the cost per viewing model. Some offer servers and software and let you load your own content and build your own metadata catalog.

In a campus setting video on demand systems make a lot of sense. Faculty should be able to assign video to watch in preperation for a lecture or lab and students should be able to see it in their dorms (or off campus on anything but a dial up connection).

And, no, Video collections will not cease to exist IMHO. Mostly because you will never get digital distribution (read streaming) rights to EVERY title in an academic video collection. Social issue docs, some features, out of print, rare titles, unknown rights holders, exorbitant fees and assorted other issues detailed by others on the list will keep many titles off line and in physical media only.

But a significant number of academic title are already available for IP distribution and universities could easily begin to make the shift to non-physical video access. Other than money, the down side to the shift is breaking old habits of faculty in using video as powerful support tool for the learning process.

Mark Richie
Xmedia2@frontiernet.net

Maureen Tripp wrote:

>Some of you may recall that I wanted to begin circulating our video resources to students--currently they circulate to faculty only, and students must use them inhouse. Well, that proposal has been soundly rejected by the faculty. When I said I wanted to continue to press for this, my boss told me that streaming media will soon render the issue moot. "In five years," she told me, "streaming video will change the entire way academic media resources will operate."
>
>Okay, I'd like to tap the collective wisdom of the list re this statement:
>1. Five years?
>2. Will video resource collections cease to exist?
>3. And on a practical level, is anyone out there using streaming video as part of a Media Resources collection--if so, how useful/effective is it?
>As always, thanks for your input!
>
>Maureen Tripp
>Media Librarian
>Media Services Center
>180 Tremont St. 3rd Floor
>Boston, MA 02116
>maureen_tripp@emerson.edu
>(617)824-8676
>
>
>
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