RE: [Videolib] Academic Libraries: Pros & Cons of Open vs. Closed

Threatt, Monique L (mthreatt@indiana.edu)
Fri, 14 Oct 2005 16:26:41 -0500

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Thanks, Michael.
=20
Our DVDs get stolen as well. Usually, it's an inside job, and we do use
DVD security cases! Go figure. We are planning to install a self check
out machine this semester. =20
=20
Library administrators argue that we place $5 or $600 books on the
shelf, so it's no different to have $2 or $300 videos on the shelf. If
it gets lost, stolen, or damaged, then we have funds to replace the
item. Of course, there are exceptions to the rule. Our very rare books
are locked in an on-site storage area, and we will do the same with rare
media titles. Still, what do you do when a faculty member shows a rare
film in class, and the equipment eats the tape? We still look for ways
to replace the item, if possible. Remember when critics predicted that
DVDs would last 100 years? Yeah, right, we can all laugh at that one.
We are lucky if a DVD makes it through the month. I've accepted the
fact that students will continue to mishandle DVDs for as long as they
around. (I'm talking about the DVDs in our open browsing collection.)
Still, patrons are requesting access to all films, not just the
entertaining ones in browsing.
=20
I do like the idea of a longer loan period. Unfortunately, we have
decided not to invest in the $25,000 plus media booking system. I know
without a proper booking module, we can expect problems in the future.
=20
I know this next statement will make some people cringe, but I agree
with Rue's comments. Circulation stats can play an important role in
determining the media budget. Sad, but true. We have many great,
documentary films that are not used due to a variety of reasons --
visiting faculty members with unique requests, media used to support a
specific program, or professional development series, etc. Should I let
unused, great docs sit and rot? Or, should I promote their use in open
stacks? Since we are a research institution, throwing away old or
unused videos is out of the question.
=20
It's just too bad that we don't have pre-cogs to let us know when a
library robbery is about to happen. Yes, it's Friday afternoon, and my
brain is fried. Tylenol, anyone?
=20
Mo

_____ =20

From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Brewer,
Michael
Sent: Friday, October 14, 2005 1:21 PM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: RE: [Videolib] Academic Libraries: Pros & Cons of Open vs.
ClosedStacks

Monique,=20

=20

We allow our media to circulate and have it in open stacks (and allow
self check out). I think there are many benefits to this, but one of
the major drawbacks is theft.=20

=20

I am not sure that theft/damage for media is comparable to the same for
other mediums. It is much easier to accidentally (and totally) damage
these media (DVD/VHS) than it is to damage print. These materials are
damaged at a much higher rate (and require replacement because of it,
not just a page replaced here or there, or a new binding) than our print
materials. They are stolen at an exponentially higher rate as well,
especially DVDs. It seems there are some customers who do not care so
much what is on the DVD, they just want DVDs (and/or they are just easy
to steal). Films go out of distribution much more quickly than most
print and are often never available again. Because there is not as
robust a system in place for the purchase of used films as there is for
used print materials and because films are very hard to get through ILL,
when a film is stolen that is out of distribution, we are rarely able to
quickly fill a request from a customer who needs to use it. We are, of
course, allowed by law to make a replacement copy, should this happen,
but I have a sneaking suspicion that very few libraries have policies
around this and most simply do not make the effort to replace the lost
or damaged copy with a replacement copy made from another legal copy.=20

=20

mb

=20

Michael Brewer

Slavic Studies, German Studies & Media Arts Librarian

University of Arizona Library A210

1510 E. University

P.O. Box 210055

Tucson, AZ 85721

Voice: 520.307.2771

Fax: 520.621.9733

brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu

-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Threatt,
Monique L
Sent: Friday, October 14, 2005 9:43 AM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] Academic Libraries: Pros & Cons of Open vs. Closed
Stacks

=20

This message is for College and University media librarians/subject area
specialists:

=20

Hello friends,

=20

Once again, this issue has reared its ugly head.

=20

We are in the process of making 90% of our Teaching and Research
collection open to IUB faculty, staff, and students. The other 10% will
remain in closed stacks, i.e., hard-to-find, rare, or out-of-print
titles. We wouldn't dare put those in open stacks.

=20

In the past, we have received student complaints about access and
circulation of the Teaching & Research collection. They want to be able
to check out films for longer than one day class use. To make a good
argument why we should (or not) provide open access, would you be so
kind as to add to the following "Pro and Con" list below. Short terms
preferable. Your help is greatly appreciated.

=20

Reasons for open vs. closed stacks:

=20

Pros: =20

easy access for all patrons

greater publicity for the collection

May inspire creative research in areas not familiar to student

May inspire students to look at films in a different light, i.e., films
that promote gender, religious, political, race tolerance

=20

=20

Cons: =20

replacement costs/theft (same concept can be applied to other mediums)

forget to bring films back for others to use (same can be applied to
other mediums)

shelving space

faculty will need to submit their media reserve requests way in advance

=20

=20

Thanks,

Monique

=20

*************************=20
Monique Threatt=20
Librarian for Media, Communication & Culture,=20
French & Italian=20
Herman B Wells Library, W121=20
Indiana University=20
Bloomington, IN 47405=20
phone: (812) 855-9857=20
FAX: (812) 855-1649=20
mthreatt@indiana.edu

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Video with Broadcast Rights

Thanks, Michael.
 
Our DVDs get stolen as well. Usually, it's an inside = job, and we=20 do use DVD security cases!  Go = figure.  We=20 are planning to install a self check out machine this=20 semester.  
 
Library=20 administrators argue that we place $5 or $600 books on = the shelf,=20 so it's no different to have $2 or $300 videos on the shelf.  = If it=20 gets lost, stolen, or damaged, then we have funds to replace the=20 item.  Of course, there are exceptions to the rule.  Our = very=20 rare books are locked in an on-site storage area, and we will do = the same=20 with rare media titles. Still, what do you do when a faculty member shows = a rare film in=20 class, and the equipment eats the tape?  We still look for = ways to=20 replace the item, if possible. =20 Remember when critics predicted that DVDs = would=20 last 100 years?  Yeah, right, we can all laugh at that = one. =20 We are lucky if a DVD makes it through the month.  I've = accepted=20 the fact that students will continue to mishandle DVDs for as long = as they=20 around.  (I'm talking about the DVDs in our open browsing = collection.)  Still, patrons are requesting access to all = films, not=20 just the entertaining ones in browsing.
 
I=20 do like the idea of a longer loan period.  Unfortunately, we have = decided=20 not to invest in the $25,000 plus media booking system.  = I know=20 without a proper booking module, we can expect problems = in the=20 future.
 
I=20 know this next statement will make some people cringe, but I agree = with=20 Rue's comments.  Circulation stats can play an important role = in=20 determining the media budget.  Sad, but = true.  We have=20 many great, documentary films that are not used due to a = variety of=20 reasons  -- visiting faculty members with unique = requests, media=20 used to support a specific program, or professional development=20 series, etc.  Should I let unused, great docs sit = and rot? =20 Or, should I promote their use in open = stacks?  Since we are=20 a research institution, throwing away old or = unused videos is out=20 of the question.
 
It's just too bad that we don't have pre-cogs to let = us know=20 when a library robbery is about to happen.  Yes, it's Friday = afternoon, and=20 my brain is fried.  Tylenol, anyone?
 
Mo


From: = videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu=20 [mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of = Brewer,=20 Michael
Sent: Friday, October 14, 2005 1:21 PM
To:=20 videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: RE: [Videolib] Academic = Libraries: Pros & Cons of Open vs. ClosedStacks

Monique,=20

 

We allow our = media to=20 circulate and have it in open stacks (and allow self check out).  I = think=20 there are many benefits to this, but one of the major drawbacks is = theft.=20

 

I am not sure = that=20 theft/damage for media is comparable to the same for other mediums. =  It is=20 much easier to accidentally (and totally) damage these media (DVD/VHS) = than it=20 is to damage print.  These materials are damaged at a much higher = rate (and=20 require replacement because of it, not just a page replaced here or = there, or a=20 new binding) than our print materials.  They are stolen at an = exponentially=20 higher rate as well, especially DVDs.  It seems there are some = customers=20 who do not care so much what is on the DVD, they just want DVDs (and/or = they are=20 just easy to steal).  Films go out of distribution much more = quickly than=20 most print and are often never available again.  Because there is = not as=20 robust a system in place for the purchase of used films as there is for = used=20 print materials and because films are very hard to get through ILL, when = a film=20 is stolen that is out of distribution, we are rarely able to quickly = fill a=20 request from a customer who needs to use it.  We are, of course, = allowed by=20 law to make a replacement copy, should this happen, but I have a = sneaking=20 suspicion that very few libraries have policies around this and most = simply do=20 not make the effort to replace the lost or damaged copy with a = replacement copy=20 made from another legal copy.

 

mb

 

Michael=20 Brewer

Slavic = Studies, German=20 Studies & Media Arts Librarian

University = of Arizona=20 Library A210

1510 E.=20 University

P.O. Box=20 210055

Tucson, AZ=20 85721

Voice:=20 520.307.2771

Fax:=20 520.621.9733

brewerm@u.library.arizona.e= du

-----Original=20 Message-----
From:=20 videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu=20 [mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Threatt, Monique = L
Sent: Friday, October 14, 2005 = 9:43=20 AM
To:=20 videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] Academic = Libraries:=20 Pros & Cons of Open vs. Closed Stacks

 

This=20 message is for College and University media librarians/subject area = specialists:

 

Hello=20 friends,

 

Once=20 again, this issue has reared its ugly head.

 

We are in=20 the process of making 90% of our Teaching and Research collection open = to IUB=20 faculty, staff, and students.  The other 10% will remain in = closed=20 stacks, i.e., hard-to-find, rare, or out-of-print titles.  We = wouldn't=20 dare put those in open stacks.

 

In the=20 past, we have received student complaints about access and = circulation of=20 the Teaching & Research collection.  They want to be able = to check=20 out films for longer than one day class use.  To make a good = argument=20 why we should (or not) provide open access, would you be so kind as to=20 add to the following "Pro and Con" list below.  Short = terms=20 preferable.   Your help is greatly = appreciated.

 

Reasons=20 for open vs. closed stacks:

 

Pros: =20

easy access for=20 all patrons

greater=20 publicity for the collection

May=20 inspire creative research in areas not familiar to = student

May=20 inspire students to look at films in a different light, i.e., films that = promote=20 gender, religious, political, race tolerance

 

 

Cons: =20

replacement = costs/theft=20 (same concept can be applied to other mediums)

forget to=20 bring films back for others to use (same can be applied to other=20 mediums)

shelving=20 space

faculty=20 will need to submit their media reserve requests way in=20 advance

 

 

Thanks,

Monique

 

*************************=20
Monique=20 Threatt
Librarian for=20 Media, Communication & Culture,
  =20 French & Italian
Herman = B Wells=20 Library, W121
Indiana=20 University
Bloomington,=20 IN  47405
phone: =20 (812) 855-9857
FAX:  (812)=20 855-1649
mthreatt@indiana.edu

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