RE: [Videolib] Academic Libraries: Pros & Cons of Open vs.

Threatt, Monique L (mthreatt@indiana.edu)
Fri, 14 Oct 2005 13:58:34 -0500

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Thanks, Rue.
I hope to see you next year!!
=20
m

_____ =20

From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Herbert, Rue
Sent: Friday, October 14, 2005 12:53 PM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: RE: [Videolib] Academic Libraries: Pros & Cons of Open vs.
ClosedStacks

I added one point to the very last "con". We have been circulating all
our media materials (DVD/VHS go out for 1-week to everyone) and shelving
all in open stacks for many years now. I truly think the positives for
the patrons outweigh the negatives for the staff. But, the negatives
aren't just for the staff. Patrons can be inconvenienced by missing or
misshelved titles, and faculty do need to plan a bit more in advance. I
will say that the scheduling processes to guarantee specific date use
can be incredibly labor intensive, particularly when you are trying to
accommodate multiple uses of the same title (even with multiple copies).
=20
We do occasionally opt to place selected titles on reserve if they are
out of print, etc. and use for all but faculty may be limited to
in-house in those cases.
=20
Although many of the cons are cons for all library materials, my
experience continues to be that patrons (particularly faculty) perceive
and use media differently. Rarely is a faculty lecture or student
presentation totally based on having a book physically available for
that specific class time.
=20
All in all, our open system works well for our patrons. I also think an
open system warrants additional staff and increased materials budget.
=20
Rue
=20
Rue M. Herbert=20
Coordinator of Media Collections=20
Technology & Technical Services=20
University of South Florida Library System=20

_____ =20

From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Threatt,
Monique L
Sent: Friday, October 14, 2005 12:43 PM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] Academic Libraries: Pros & Cons of Open vs. Closed
Stacks

This message is for College and University media librarians/subject area
specialists:
=20
Hello friends,
=20
Once again, this issue has reared its ugly head.
=20
We are in the process of making 90% of our Teaching and Research
collection open to IUB faculty, staff, and students. The other 10% will
remain in closed stacks, i.e., hard-to-find, rare, or out-of-print
titles. We wouldn't dare put those in open stacks.
=20
In the past, we have received student complaints about access and
circulation of the Teaching & Research collection. They want to be able
to check out films for longer than one day class use. To make a good
argument why we should (or not) provide open access, would you be so
kind as to add to the following "Pro and Con" list below. Short terms
preferable. Your help is greatly appreciated.
=20
Reasons for open vs. closed stacks:
=20
Pros: =20
easy access for all patrons
greater publicity for the collection
May inspire creative research in areas not familiar to student
May inspire students to look at films in a different light, i.e., films
that promote gender, religious, political, race tolerance
=20
=20
Cons: =20
replacement costs/theft (same concept can be applied to other mediums)
forget to bring films back for others to use (same can be applied to
other mediums)
shelving space
faculty will need to submit their media reserve requests way in advance
-- and a strong scheduling procedure will probably need to be developed=20
=20
=20
Thanks,
Monique
=20

*************************=20
Monique Threatt=20
Librarian for Media, Communication & Culture,=20
French & Italian=20
Herman B Wells Library, W121=20
Indiana University=20
Bloomington, IN 47405=20
phone: (812) 855-9857=20
FAX: (812) 855-1649=20
mthreatt@indiana.edu

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Video with Broadcast Rights

Thanks, Rue.
I hope to see you next = year!!
 
m


From: = videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu=20 [mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of = Herbert,=20 Rue
Sent: Friday, October 14, 2005 12:53 PM
To:=20 videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: RE: [Videolib] Academic = Libraries: Pros & Cons of Open vs. ClosedStacks

I added one point to the very last = "con".  We have=20 been circulating all our media materials (DVD/VHS go out for 1-week to = everyone)=20 and shelving all in open stacks for many years now.  I truly think = the=20 positives for the patrons outweigh the negatives for the staff.  = But, the=20 negatives aren't just for the staff.  Patrons can be inconvenienced = by=20 missing or misshelved titles, and faculty do need to plan a bit more in=20 advance.  I will say that the scheduling processes to guarantee = specific=20 date use can be incredibly labor intensive, particularly when you are = trying to=20 accommodate multiple uses of the same title (even with multiple=20 copies).
 
We do occasionally opt to place selected = titles on=20 reserve if they are out of print, etc. and use for all but faculty may = be=20 limited to in-house in those cases.
 
Although many of the cons are cons for all = library=20 materials, my experience continues to be that patrons (particularly=20 faculty) perceive and use media differently.  Rarely is a = faculty=20 lecture or student presentation totally based on having a book = physically=20 available for that specific class time.
 
All in all, our open system works well = for our=20 patrons.  I also think an open system warrants additional staff and = increased materials budget.
 
Rue
 

Rue M. = Herbert=20
Coordinator of Media=20 Collections
Technology & Technical Services
University of South Florida = Library=20 System



From: = videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu=20 [mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of = Threatt,=20 Monique L
Sent: Friday, October 14, 2005 12:43 = PM
To:=20 videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] Academic = Libraries:=20 Pros & Cons of Open vs. Closed Stacks

This message is for College and University = media=20 librarians/subject area specialists:
 
Hello friends,
 
Once again, this issue has reared its ugly=20 head.
 
We are in the process of making 90% of our = Teaching and=20 Research collection open to IUB faculty, staff, and = students.  The=20 other 10% will remain in closed stacks, i.e., hard-to-find, rare, = or=20 out-of-print titles.  We wouldn't dare put those in open=20 stacks.
 
In the past, we have received student = complaints about=20 access and circulation of the Teaching & Research = collection. =20 They want to be able to check out films for longer than one day class=20 use.  To make a good argument why we should (or not) provide = open=20 access, would you be so kind as to add to the following "Pro = and Con"=20 list below.  Short terms preferable.   Your=20 help is greatly appreciated.
 
Reasons for open vs. closed = stacks:
 
Pros: 
easy access for all = patrons
greater publicity for the = collection
May inspire creative research in areas not = familiar to=20 student
May inspire students to look at films in a = different light,=20 i.e., films that promote gender, religious, political, race=20 tolerance
 
 
Cons: 
replacement costs/theft (same concept can be = applied to=20 other mediums)
forget to bring films back for others to use = (same can be=20 applied to other mediums)
shelving space
faculty will need to submit their media = reserve=20 requests way in advance -- = and a strong scheduling procedure will probably need to = be=20 developed 
 
 
Thanks,
Monique
 

*************************
Monique = Threatt=20
Librarian for = Media,=20 Communication & Culture,
   French & = Italian=20
Herman B Wells = Library,=20 W121
Indiana=20 University
Bloomington, IN  47405
phone:  (812) = 855-9857=20
FAX:  (812)=20 855-1649
mthreatt@indiana.edu

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