RE: [SPAM] - [Videolib] Blu-Ray and HD DVD - Email found in subject

Jaeschke, Myles (mjaesch@tulsalibrary.org)
Tue, 4 Oct 2005 13:46:09 -0500

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Becky--
Below is text from another newsgroup regarding Hi-Definition Discs. For
me, this sums it up for me quite nicely. =20
=20
"HD DVD" give us only 15GB against 25GB of BlueRay (Sony's BluRay
disc can store more information).

To be really better than DVDs, a new format must:=20

- Have around 25-75GB in first generation, possibly extending to 150GB
later=20

- Have a 'native' codec that can deliver high definition AV at about
2GB/hour (mpeg4 is nearly there) (it's currently 2.35GB/hour) and has
all requirements of copy protection and so on. (This one is not as
important in my opinion-the storage capacity will already be high.
=20
Also note here that current studio DVDs are not in mpeg4. They use a
different system (mpeg2) which take up more space per hour.

- Be scractch resistant (Yeah, right)

- Have a well defined filesystem which can be used transparently by
tabletop video recording, PC editing and audio mastering (it's not
difficult, damnit, just make the first and the third a well defined
subset of the second) (This would allow a user to record broadcasts,
and edit for personal use--or make working with hi-def video easier)

- Completely support multisessions. (This is for doing multiple
recordings on the same disc--not necessarily erasing it)

- Have a standard frontend (UI) to easily access the content=20

Otherwise, it's just a big DVD.
=20
Now I ask--how many of us have an HD-Television at home? Not many
would be my guess. Are you or your customer base going to be running
out and dropping a $1000+ for a new HD-TV anytime soon? I ask this
because a user MUST have an HD-TV in order to reap the benefits of
either new format (HD-DVD or BluRay).
=20
One more thing for you two consider. This is from
http://www.tutorgig.com/ed/High-definition_television. There is much
more fun and exciting technical jargon there if you care to read it, but
I thought this paragraph was important enough for you see.=20
=20
Because HDTV requires extra broadcast spectrum during the transition
period, it has become a topic of political controversy in the United
States. Current stations have received a free channel, generally in the
UHF range, on which to broadcast their digital signal, while still
maintaining analog service. According to FCC rules, all full power
stations on channels 2-51 must convert to digital by the beginning of
2007 <http://www.tutorgig.com/ed/2007> , with an escape clause that 85%
of receivers in the service area must be "capable" of receiving digital
signals. At the time of analog shutoff, one channel would then be
returned to the government for sale to a new licensee, with the digital
one remaining. Existing analog TV sets would still work with cable or
satellite service or use a converter box that would convert digital
over-the-air (OTA) signals to analog. As of January 2004
<http://www.tutorgig.com/ed/As_of_2004> , indications from industry and
FCC officials including its chairman are that the cutoff date for
digital-only broadcasts will not meet the intended 2007
<http://www.tutorgig.com/ed/2007> and the actual timeline for analog
shutoff in the US will realistically be in the 2010
<http://www.tutorgig.com/ed/2010> - 2015
<http://www.tutorgig.com/ed/2015> timeframe.
=20
The short story is this--Wait and see, this one is going to take a
while in my opinion. I hope this wasn't too "techy".
=20
Best,
Myles Jaeschke
=20
Tulsa City-County Library
Media Librarian

________________________________

From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Tatar, Becky
Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2005 11:23 AM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [SPAM] - [Videolib] Blu-Ray and HD DVD - Email found in subject

Just checking to see what everyone's plans for these two formats are.
Are you jumping in on both sides? Are you going to take a wait and see
attitude to see if one format becomes dominant? Will you wait for
patron demand? I know this is a repeat of the VHS/Betamax problem in
the 80s. Is one of these formats better, or are they equal in quality?
Inquiring minds want to know, and in English, not technospeak. Thanks,
and now I'll go whimper in the corner.

Becky Tatar=20
Periodicals/Audiovisuals=20
Aurora Public Library=20
1 E. Benton Street=20
Aurora, IL 60505=20
Phone: 630-264-4100=20
FAX: 630-896-3209=20
bltata@aurora.lib.il.us=20
www.aurora.lib.il.us <file://www.aurora.lib.il.us> =20

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Blu-Ray and HD DVD

Becky--
Below is text from another = newsgroup=20 regarding Hi-Definition Discs. For me, this sums it up for me quite nicely. =20
 
"HD DVD" give us=20 only 15GB against 25GB of BlueRay    (Sony's BluRay disc can = store=20 more information).

To be really better than DVDs, a new = format=20 must:

- Have around 25-75GB in first generation, possibly = extending to=20 150GB later

- Have a = 'native'=20 codec that can deliver high definition AV at about 2GB/hour (mpeg4 is = nearly=20 there)  (it's = currently=20 2.35GB/hour) and has all requirements of copy = protection and=20 so on.  (This one is not as important = in my=20 opinion-the storage capacity will already be=20 high.
 
Also note here that current studio DVDs are not in mpeg4.  = They use=20 a different system (mpeg2) which take up more space per=20 hour.


- Be scractch = resistant (Yeah, = right)

- Have=20 a well defined filesystem which can be used transparently by tabletop = video=20 recording, PC editing and audio mastering (it's not difficult, damnit, = just make=20 the first and the third a well defined subset of the second)  (This would allow a user = to record=20 broadcasts, and edit for personal use--or make working with hi-def video = easier)

- Completely support = multisessions.  (This is for doing multiple = recordings on=20 the same disc--not necessarily erasing it)

- Have a = standard frontend (UI) to easily access the content

Otherwise, = it's just=20 a big DVD.
 
Now I=20 ask--how many of us have an HD-Television at home?   Not many = would be=20 my guess.  Are you or your customer base going to be running out = and=20 dropping a $1000+ for a new HD-TV anytime soon?  I ask this = because a=20 user MUST have an HD-TV in order to reap the benefits of either new = format=20 (HD-DVD or BluRay).
 
One more thing = for you two=20 consider.  This is from http://www= .tutorgig.com/ed/High-definition_television.=20 There is much more fun and exciting technical jargon there if you care = to read=20 it, but I thought this paragraph was important enough for you=20 see. 
 
Because HDTV requires extra broadcast spectrum during the = transition=20 period, it has become a topic of political controversy in the United = States.=20 Current stations have received a free channel, generally in the UHF = range, on=20 which to broadcast their digital signal, while still maintaining analog = service.=20 According to FCC rules, all full power stations on channels 2-51 must = convert to=20 digital by the beginning of 2007,=20 with an escape clause that 85% of receivers in the service area must be=20 "capable" of receiving digital signals. At the time of analog shutoff, = one=20 channel would then be returned to the government for sale to a new = licensee,=20 with the digital one remaining. Existing analog TV sets would still work = with=20 cable or satellite service or use a converter box that would convert = digital=20 over-the-air (OTA) signals to analog. As of January 2004, = indications=20 from industry and FCC officials including its chairman are that the = cutoff date=20 for digital-only broadcasts will not meet the intended 2007 and the actual = timeline for=20 analog shutoff in the US will realistically be in the 2010– 2015 timeframe.
 
The short story is this--Wait and see,  = this one is=20 going to take a while in my opinion.  I hope this wasn't too=20 "techy".
 
Best,
Myles=20 Jaeschke
 
Tulsa = City-County=20 Library
Media=20 Librarian


From: = videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu=20 [mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of = Tatar,=20 Becky
Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2005 11:23 AM
To:=20 videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [SPAM] - [Videolib] = Blu-Ray and=20 HD DVD - Email found in subject

Just checking to see what everyone's = plans for these=20 two formats are.  Are you jumping in on both sides?  Are you = going to=20 take a wait and see attitude to see if one format becomes = dominant?  Will=20 you wait for patron demand?  I know this is a repeat of the = VHS/Betamax=20 problem in the 80s.  Is one of these formats better, or are they = equal in=20 quality?  Inquiring minds want to know, and in English, not=20 technospeak.  Thanks, and now I'll go whimper in the = corner.

Becky Tatar
Periodicals/Audiovisuals
Aurora Public=20 Library
1 E. Benton Street =
Aurora, IL   60505
Phone:=20 630-264-4100
FAX: 630-896-3209 =
bltata@aurora.lib.il.us
www.aurora.lib.il.us =


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