Re: [Videolib] another fair use question

Jerry Notaro (notaro@stpt.usf.edu)
Wed, 21 Sep 2005 10:53:04 -0500

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> Let's look at the other side of this for a minute. Because we follow the
> guidelines very closely at Middlebury, the Hispanic Alliance on our campus
> will probably not be screening two Spanish-language movies for their group
> this month. The public performance fee was close to a thousand dollars for the
> two and the club doesn't have that much in their budget. It doesn't require
> too much imagination to see this as somewhat of an impediment to learning.
> Sure, they can see the film if it's a part of the Spanish 101 curriculum, but
> they can't see it as a group unless they are able to shell out $1,000 for the
> privilege. Public performance prices for these sorts of programs are way too
> high. We expect to pay those prices for College-wide entertainment-related
> film series but shouldn't have to strain our budgets to offer realistic
> enrichment programs to language groups. We are being fair to the distributors,
> but are we being entirely fair to our students? Do we have a responsibility as
> educators to push the envelope in favor of more realistic "fair use"?
>
> Do you look good in silver bracelets??????
>
> Kidding aside, the law here is very clear. Administrators would love for us to
> bend the law. Fair is not what we determine to be fair, but to how the
> Copyright Law has been written. And it is written very clearly as to what is
> legal and what could get you and your institution into some serious trouble.
>
> Jerry

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Re: [Videolib] another fair use question

Let's look at the other side of this for a minute. Because we follo= w the guidelines very closely at Middlebury, the Hispanic Alliance on our ca= mpus will probably not be screening two Spanish-language movies for their gr= oup this month. The public performance fee was close to a thousand dollars f= or the two and the club doesn't have that much in their budget. It doesn't r= equire too much imagination to see this as somewhat of an impediment to lear= ning. Sure, they can see the film if it's a part of the Spanish 101 curricul= um, but they can't see it as a group unless they are able to shell out $1,00= 0 for the privilege. Public performance prices for these sorts of programs a= re way too high. We expect to pay those prices for College-wide entertainmen= t-related film series but shouldn't have to strain our budgets to offer real= istic enrichment programs to language groups. We are being fair to the distr= ibutors, but are we being entirely fair to our students? Do we have a respon= sibility as educators to push the envelope in favor of more realistic "= fair use"?

Do you look good in silver bracelets??????

Kidding aside, the law here is very clear. Administrators would love for us= to bend the law. Fair is not what we determine to be fair, but to how the C= opyright Law has been written. And it is written very clearly as to what is = legal and what could get you and your institution into some serious trouble.=

Jerry

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