[Videolib] Darknet : Hollywood's War Against the Digital Generation

Bergman, Barbara J (barbara.bergman@mnsu.edu)
Thu, 15 Sep 2005 17:10:17 -0500

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I happened to find this title on our New Book shelves. Seemed appropos
of today's topics...=20
Any of you found similar books out there on this topic?

Top of Form
Darknet : Hollywood's War Against the Digital Generation (Hardcover)
by J. D. Lasica
<http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/index=3Dbooks&field-=
a
uthor-exact=3DJ.%20D.%20%20Lasica&rank=3D-relevance%2C%2Bavailability%2C-=
dat
erank/104-1756561-8397567> =20
Editorial Reviews
>From Publishers Weekly
Rapid-fire advances in technology have transformed home entertainment.
Not only can we store hours of television programming and music on hard
drives, software has made it easy to create our own movies and songs,
splicing and sampling professional-grade material into amateur
productions. Entertainment conglomerates are understandably concerned,
but in online journalist Lasica's reporting on the culture clash over
digital distribution and remixing, corporations are simplistically
portrayed as dinosaurs intent on stifling the little guy's creative
freedom in order to protect their profit margins. The characterization
is not entirely unmerited, but the deck feels unfairly stacked when "Big
Entertainment" honchos are juxtaposed with a preacher who illegally
copies and downloads movies so he can use short clips for his sermons.
Similarly, Lasica infuses the allegedly inevitable triumph of
"participatory culture" with a sense of entitlement and anti-corporate
bias that he never fully addresses. Lasica's interviews are far-ranging,
and he provides a cogent analysis of the broad problems with America's
outdated legal framework for dealing with intellectual property rights
and the need for the entertainment industry to adapt to new
technologies. Too often, though, he falls back to an alarmist tone. With
so many other works addressing this issue from both sides, it will be
hard for Lasica's book to stand out from the pack. (May 13)=20
Copyright (c) Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier
Inc. All rights reserved.

>From Booklist
<http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/subst/partners/marketing/booklist.htm
l/104-1756561-8397567>=20
When the music-recording industry took a hard-line legal stance against
file sharers, it alienated its customer base and hurt its own sales. A
similar battle is brewing in the movie industry, as faster Internet
speeds and video compression are making it easier to download entire
movies over the Net for free. Lasica, a top online journalist, takes us
into the Internet movie underground, where an elite club of pirates
known as "rippers" and "crackers" secretly obtain copies of movies and
release them in cyberspace. At the other extreme are the Hollywood
studios, which are treating ordinary users like thieves, placing such
shackles on digital media that we can't legally make a backup copy of a
DVD we own and soon restricting the copying and sharing of
high-definition TV. Contrast this with the freedoms that computers give
us to remix, copy, and paste video and to author DVDs, and you have a
scenario where ordinary producers of creative art become felons. Lasica
takes the middle view that while copyrights need to be protected, the
continual erosion of fair-use rights needs to be addressed. David
Siegfried
Copyright (c) American Library Association. All rights reserved

Product Details
* Hardcover: 320 pages
* Publisher: John Wiley & Sons (April 15, 2005)
* Language: English
* ISBN: 0471683345=09

Barb Bergman=20
Media Services Librarian
Minnesota State University-Mankato
(507) 389-5945 =20

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Darknet : Hollywood's War Against the Digital Generation

I happened to find this title on our New Book = shelves. Seemed appropos of todays topics

Any of you found similar books out = there on this topic?


Top = of Form

Darknet : Hollywood's War = Against the Digital Generation (Hardcover)
by
J. D. = Lasica

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly
Rapid-fire advances in technology have transformed home entertainment. = Not only can we store hours of television programming and music on hard = drives, software has made it easy to create our own movies and songs, = splicing and sampling professional-grade material into amateur = productions. Entertainment conglomerates are understandably concerned, = but in online journalist Lasica's reporting on the culture clash over = digital distribution and remixing, corporations are simplistically = portrayed as dinosaurs intent on stifling the little guy's creative = freedom in order to protect their profit margins. The characterization = is not entirely unmerited, but the deck feels unfairly stacked when = "Big Entertainment" honchos are juxtaposed with a preacher who = illegally copies and downloads movies so he can use short clips for his = sermons. Similarly, Lasica infuses the allegedly inevitable triumph of = "participatory culture" with a sense of entitlement and = anti-corporate bias that he never fully addresses. Lasica's interviews = are far-ranging, and he provides a cogent analysis of the broad problems = with America's outdated legal framework for dealing with intellectual = property rights and the need for the entertainment industry to adapt to = new technologies. Too often, though, he falls back to an alarmist tone. = With so many other works addressing this issue from both sides, it will = be hard for Lasica's book to stand out from the pack. (May = 13)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier = Inc. All rights reserved.

From
Booklist
When the music-recording industry took a hard-line legal stance against = file sharers, it alienated its customer base and hurt its own sales. A = similar battle is brewing in the movie industry, as faster Internet = speeds and video compression are making it easier to download entire = movies over the Net for free. Lasica, a top online journalist, takes us = into the Internet movie underground, where an elite club of pirates = known as "rippers" and "crackers" secretly obtain = copies of movies and release them in cyberspace. At the other extreme = are the Hollywood studios, which are treating ordinary users like = thieves, placing such shackles on digital media that we can't legally = make a backup copy of a DVD we own and soon restricting the copying and = sharing of high-definition TV. Contrast this with the freedoms that = computers give us to remix, copy, and paste video and to author DVDs, = and you have a scenario where ordinary producers of creative art become = felons. Lasica takes the middle view that while copyrights need to be = protected, the continual erosion of fair-use rights needs to be = addressed. David Siegfried
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights = reserved

Product Details

·       Hardcover: 320 pages
·       Publisher: John Wiley & Sons (April 15, = 2005)
·       Language: English
·       ISBN: = 0471683345       

Barb Bergman =

Media = Services Librarian

Minnesota State University-Mankato

(507) = 389-5945           = ;       =

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