Re: [Videolib] TEACH act for streaming

Jessica Rosner (jrosner@kino.com)
Wed, 27 Apr 2005 11:35:29 -0400

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> I confess that I have been utterly confused by the whole thing but much o=
f
> this has to do with the fact
> that I am luddite with little technical knowledge. In terms of the paragr=
aph
> below I thought the thing
> about digitizing a work for a teaching situation was that you could only =
do it
> if it were not already available in
> digital format. Wouldn=B9t that eliminate being able to digitize a VHS is t=
he
> film is out on DVD. I honestly have
> no idea
>=20
> Also for the record I have had to turn down most requests I have gotten t=
o
> either digitize or put on line
> something in our catalogue because in many cases WE DON=B9T HAVE THOSE RIGH=
TS
> ourselves. If a University
> asks me to say put a section L=B9Age D=B9Or on a web site I can=B9t help them=
as
> our contract would not permit it and
> most likely the rights holder in Europe could not grant it without OUR
> permission so you can see their
> are a lot of rights complications here
>=20
> Regards
>=20
> Jessica
>=20
>=20
>=20
> The "copyprotected copy" provision of TEACH is also interestin=
g.
> Let's say a professor has a legitimate request to use a 9 minute portion=
of
> a specific feature film in a teaching situation that would qualify under
> TEACH. But the college library has the title only on a copy protected DV=
D.
> Circumventing the copy protection to make the 9 minute clip available on =
the
> network is illegal. BUT ! If the college can locate a legal VHS copy wit=
hout
> copyprotection, then they can make a digital copy of the 9 minutes requir=
ed
> and put it up on the server for the professor and his/her students. It m=
akes
> a good case for retaining all the VHS copies of titles now being replaced=
with
> DVD. (see the U. Texas copyright site on this on too.)
>=20
> The way TEACH and the rewrite of 110(2) is constructed it plays to =
the
> occasional need to use sound and motion media in networked/distance teach=
ing
> environment. What hasn't evolved out of the discussion on the List is th=
e
> state of digital distribution systems and the process of building digital
> video libraries that professors can access for class use and students can
> access from dorm or home.
>=20
> Mark Richie
> Professional Has Been
>> =20
>>=20
>>=20
>> =20
>=20
>=20

Proud Resident of a BLUE STATE
=20
Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com
212-629-6880

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Re: [Videolib] TEACH act for streaming

I confess that I have been utterly confused by the whole thing but mu= ch of this has to do with the fact
that I am luddite with little technical knowledge. In terms of the paragrap= h below I thought the thing
about digitizing a work for a teaching situation was that you could only do= it  if it were not already available in
digital format. Wouldn’t that eliminate being able to digitize a VHS = is the film is out on DVD. I honestly have
no idea

Also for the record I have had to turn down most requests I have gotten to = either digitize or put on line
something in our catalogue because in many cases WE DON’T HAVE THOSE = RIGHTS ourselves. If a University
asks me to say put  a section L’Age D’Or on  a web si= te I can’t help them as our contract would not permit it and
most likely the rights holder in Europe could not grant it without OUR perm= ission so you can see their
are a lot of rights complications here

Regards

Jessica



           The "= ;copyprotected copy" provision of TEACH is also interesting.  Let'= s say a professor has a  legitimate request to use a 9 minute portion o= f  a specific feature film in a teaching situation that would qualify u= nder TEACH.  But the college library has the title only on a copy prote= cted DVD.  Circumventing the copy protection to make the 9 minute clip = available on the network is illegal.  BUT ! If the college can locate a= legal VHS copy without copyprotection, then they can make a digital copy of= the 9 minutes required and put it up on the server for the professor and hi= s/her students.  It makes a good case for retaining all the VHS copies = of titles now being replaced with DVD. (see the U. Texas copyright site on t= his on too.)

      The way TEACH and the rewrite of 110(2)= is constructed it plays to the occasional need to use sound and motion medi= a in networked/distance teaching environment.  What hasn't evolved out = of the discussion on the List is the state of digital distribution systems a= nd the process of building digital video libraries that professors can acces= s for class use and students can access from dorm or home.  

Mark Richie
Professional Has Been



  






Proud Resident of a BLUE STATE
 
Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com
212-629-6880

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