RE: [Videolib] formats: DVD vs VHS vs ??

Sue Parks (SueParks@library.unt.edu)
Wed, 20 Apr 2005 14:30:50 -0500

Melissa,

In the past year, we've sent 50-60 DVD titles to rubberdisc.com for repair, and I've replaced another 20-30. I've only repaired or replaced 4-5 VHS.

Although faculty love the sound and picture quality and the extra features on DVDs, they hate how cumbersome it is to queue specific clips to show in class.

Sue

Sue Parks
Head, Media Library / Multimedia Development Lab
University of North Texas
P.O. Box 305190
Denton, TX 76203-5190
Phone: 940.369.7249
Fax: 940.369.7396
sueparks@library.unt.edu

>>> mriley@sfpl.org 04/20/05 12:42 PM >>>
Debbie
You have partially answered your own question!
But here are a few more ideas.
1. Overlapping technologies are always a good idea:
Although the lightness, random access, and improved picture quality of DVDs and the additional material and options on them are a real plus, many people will continue to own VCR players for many years--especially since you can copy off the air or play your old videos on a VCR. Although many publishers are no longer releasing VHS, I suspect that trend will not be across the board for all titles. If you keep or collect a VHS and a DVD of a title it gives those patrons options--and if the DVD bites the dust at least you have something to offer.
2. A bargain:
Many videos are really cheap right now!!
2. Ease of use and durability of the equipment:
Children under eight, those with a variety of disabitities, the impatient, and elders frequently find VCRs easier to operate and harder to break: Just Push Play. Guardians and parents often will not allow their charges to use a DVD player because of its greater fragility (that tray that comes out) and complexity. And the DVDs are more fragile as well. For example, for the vision impaired, palsied, or sleepy, a VCR (or audio tape player) can be operated without looking more easily than a DVD (or CD) player which has more buttons to push and menus to decipher.

I would love to hear more about the longevity and fragility of each of these media, and why they last or not. Does anyone know of statistics or studies? Anecdotes?
Melissa Riley

-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu on behalf of Deborah Benrubi
Sent: Wed 4/20/2005 9:31 AM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Cc:
Subject: [Videolib] formats: DVD vs VHS vs ??


Does it make sense to buy VHS tapes if the content is offered in digital
format? I've worked myself into a possibly pointless quandary over this,
given that many people don't even use VCRs any more. But we're finding
circulating DVDs to be so fragile, whereas most of our older VHS tapes have
lasted many years, Does anyone have a policy of continuing to collect in VHS?

Deborah Benrubi
Technical Services Librarian
University of San Francisco
Gleeson Library|Geschke Center
2130 Fulton St.
San Francisco, CA 94117

PHONE (415) 422-5672 / FAX (415) 422-2233 or 422-5062
EMAIL <benrubi@usfca.edu>

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