RE: [Videolib] lending video and film

Brewer, Michael (brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu)
Thu, 7 Apr 2005 11:48:21 -0700

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Gary,=20

=20

I think you are right here (and I found this document after I had
already sent off my message and exposed my ignorance. Oh well...). All
requests should be looked at on a case by case basis. However, if we
make it clear to libraries at large that this is a possibility (There is
an OCLC page somewhere that indicates who will or will not loan media
and almost no large academic libraries are on the list), we can then at
least allow ILL from other schools to approach us about the possibility
and work out the particulars (like it can't leave the building, or it
has to remain in Special Collections, etc.) Right now it seems that so
few academic oriented libraries publicly state they will consider
loaning media that people in ILL rarely even try to fill such requests
and even fewer customers make these requests.=20

=20

I would encourage you all to reconsider your ILL policies. I am
planning on doing this here.

=20

mb=20

=20

Michael Brewer

Slavic Studies, German Studies & Media Arts Librarian

University of Arizona Library A210

1510 E. University

P.O. Box 210055

Tucson, AZ 85721

Voice: 520.307.2771

Fax: 520.621.9733

brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu

-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Gary Handman
Sent: Thursday, April 07, 2005 10:04 AM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: RE: [Videolib] lending video and film

=20

Hi

ALA-sanctioned=20

Guidelines for the Interlibrary Loan of Audiovisual Formats=20

exist
http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/pubguidelines/guidelinesinterlibrary.htm

I was not a particularly enthusiastic supporter, I've got to say. In
academe, the bottom line is often curricular access to resources. Most
of our collections have as a primary mission the support of classroom
teaching and learning. Most of us generally buy single copies of
materials. It's clear to me that the prediction of what is likely to be
needed for a class is far from a precise art: you can talk about
forcing faculty to reserve in advance all you want; you can try to
predict probable forthcoming need based on past use patterns. It's
still a crap shoot. Similarly, the vagaries of the marketplace are such
that you can never really tell whether that piece you've loaned out is
gonna be replaceable next month. In the case of large collections with
a fair amount of non-mainstream material, that uncertainty is increased.

So, in terms of loaning things out, I'm always going to lean toward
being fairly conservative. ILL requests are considered on a case by
case basis (we only loan to other libraries in the UC System). In the
long run, I think that's the only way to ensure we meet our mission of
serving teaching on this campus.=20

At 08:20 AM 4/7/2005 -0700, you wrote:

All,=20

I think it is critical that we figure out how to better allow for the
borrowing of media from other institutions. I think most places that
don't allow borrowing do so because they don't trust that the media will
return undamaged. =20

Film is being used more and more in courses and in scholarship across
disciplines. Films also often go out of print very quickly and are
damaged/lost/stolen at an exponentially higher rate than other media (at
least in our library). In this new access over ownership environment,
film scholars (and those that use film) end up getting the short end of
the stick: because we (I am speaking of our institution and others like
it) focus on access and put less money into purchasing materials as we
did in the past, if we were not lucky enough to purchase all the films
that our faculty would need in the future at the time of their release
(and that is never possible with the funds we are given) and even if
none of those films were stolen, lost or damaged, our faculty do not
have the same access to items (films) we don't own through ILL as our
print oriented faculty have. =20

It seems that, were clear stipulations on use (or levels of use) defined
for media loaned through ILL (perhaps some would loan only if the film
were to be used in a class or would remain in the library, or even,
forgive me public libraries, would only be loaned to academic libraries,
etc.). Perhaps such gradations of use already exist. I don't know.
Because ILL is a separate unit in our library, I have very little to do
with what goes on there. I have, however, spoken with them about the
issue of getting copies of videos that we owned but were lost, stolen or
damaged and are not available for sale from other libraries (so we could
make a legal copy) and was told that ILL departments often can make
special loan agreements on a case by case basis for things like this (to
borrow an out of print video from a library that usually doesn't loan
videos in order to make a legal copy in house). =20

Does VRT make recommendations to national ILL groups? How much control
do other media librarians have over whether or not their collections are
loaned out through ILL? If you have had control over this and have not
allowed your collection to be loaned out, why not? What are the
issues/impediments? Are there horror stories of what has happened when
titles were loaned out, even with strict limitations on their use?

Thanks,=20

mb

Michael Brewer
Slavic Studies, German Studies & Media Arts Librarian
University of Arizona Library A210
1510 E. University
P.O. Box 210055
Tucson, AZ 85721
Voice: 520.307.2771
Fax: 520.621.9733
brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu

-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Bergman,
Barbara J
Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2005 4:11 PM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: RE: [Videolib] lending video and film

Most of you have heard my pro-ILL soapbox speech before but...

We starting lending 3 years ago. It's been a very positive experience.=20
As we all know, video collections are expensive. No library can possibly
own every video any more than it can have afford every book.

We lend videos with minimal restrictions. (The one unbreakable
restriction is that it doesn't go out if there's an upcoming booking.)=20
We follow a reciprocal borrowing/lending policy in that we only borrow
material types that they will lend and vice versa. This is fairly common
for ILL (especially when it comes to charging a fee for lending). In
translation: We only lend videos to requesting libraries who allow us
access to their videos in exchange. =20
The first year, we compiled a list of all titles loaned and borrowed --
it was a fascinating mix of educational titles and feature films. We've
consistently borrowed twice as many videos as we've lent each semester.
---------
Re: older formats. We will lend 16mm films on a case-by-case basis. Most
of the time when ILL staff replies with "Did you know this is a 16mm
film?" the response is "never mind I thought it was a videotape..."

-------------
For policy, the VRT and ACRL have published guidelines that suggest
video ILL practices:

Guidelines for Media Resources in Academic Libraries (1999)
http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/guidelinesmedia.htm

5.1 Media resources should be accessible through resource sharing, in
accordance with the ALA Video Round Table Guidelines for the
Interlibrary Loan of Audiovisual Formats.
Commentary: Many libraries treat media collections as special
collections and prohibit their interlibrary loan. However, library users
benefit when media collections are included in resource-sharing
programs. No library can meet all of its users' needs for media
resources, but libraries are reluctant to lend to our users if we do not
lend to their users. The guidelines recognize that some materials may be
excluded, but in general, there is no reason to exclude entire formats
from interlibrary lending.

VRT Guidelines for the Interlibrary Loan of Audiovisual Formats
(1997)http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/pubguidelines/guidelinesinterlibrary.ht
m

=20
------------

Barb Bergman=20
Media Services Librarian
Minnesota State University-Mankato
(507) 389-5945 =20

_______________________________________________
Videolib mailing list
Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib

_______________________________________________
Videolib mailing list
Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

****

"Movies are poems, a holy bible, the great mother of us."
--Ted Berrigan

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Gary,

 

I think you are right here (and I = found this document after I had already sent off my message and exposed my ignorance.  Oh well…).  All requests should be looked at = on a case by case basis.  However, if we make it clear to libraries at = large that this is a possibility (There is an OCLC page somewhere that indicates = who will or will not loan media and almost no large academic libraries are on the = list), we can then at least allow ILL from other schools to approach us about = the possibility and work out the particulars (like it can’t leave the building, or it has to remain in Special Collections, etc.) Right now it = seems that so few academic oriented libraries publicly state they will = consider loaning media that people in ILL rarely even try to fill such requests = and even fewer customers make these requests.

 

I would encourage you all to = reconsider your ILL policies.   I am planning on doing this = here.

 

mb

 

Michael Brewer

Slavic Studies, German Studies & = Media Arts Librarian

University of Arizona Library = A210

1510 E. University

P.O. Box 210055

Tucson, AZ 85721

Voice: = 520.307.2771

Fax: 520.621.9733

brewerm@u.library.arizona.e= du

-----Original = Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu [mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Gary Handman
Sent: Thursday, April 07, = 2005 10:04 AM
To: = videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: RE: [Videolib] = lending video and film

 

Hi

ALA-sanctioned =

Guidelines for the Interlibrary Loan of = Audiovisual Formats

exist http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/pubguidelines/guidelinesinter= library.htm

I was not a particularly enthusiastic supporter, I've got to say.  = In academe, the bottom line is often curricular access to resources.  = Most of our collections have as a primary mission the support of classroom = teaching and learning.  Most of us generally buy single copies of = materials.  It's clear to me that the prediction of what is likely to be needed for a = class is far from a precise art:  you can talk about forcing faculty to = reserve in advance all you want; you can try to predict probable forthcoming need = based on past use patterns.  It's still a crap shoot.  Similarly, the = vagaries of the marketplace are such that you can never really tell whether that = piece you've loaned out is gonna be replaceable  next month.  In the = case of large collections with a fair amount of non-mainstream material, that uncertainty is increased.

So, in terms of loaning things out, I'm always going to lean toward = being fairly conservative.   ILL requests are considered on a case by case = basis (we only loan to other libraries in the UC System).  In the long = run, I think that's the only way to ensure we meet our mission of serving = teaching on this campus.



At 08:20 AM 4/7/2005 -0700, you wrote:

All,

I think it is critical that we figure out how to better allow for the = borrowing of media from other institutions.  I think most places that don't = allow borrowing do so because they don't trust that the media will return = undamaged. 

Film is being used more and more in courses and in scholarship across disciplines.  Films also often go out of print very quickly and are damaged/lost/stolen at an exponentially higher rate than other media (at = least in our library).  In this new access over ownership environment, = film scholars (and those that use film) end up getting the short end of the = stick: because we (I am speaking of our institution and others like it) focus = on access and put less money into purchasing materials as we did in the = past, if we were not lucky enough to purchase all the films that our faculty = would need in the future at the time of their release (and that is never possible = with the funds we are given) and even if none of those films were stolen, lost or = damaged, our faculty do not have the same access to items (films) we don't own = through ILL as our print oriented faculty have. 

It seems that, were clear stipulations on use (or levels of use) defined = for media loaned through ILL (perhaps some would loan only if the film were = to be used in a class or would remain in the library, or even, forgive me = public libraries, would only be loaned to academic libraries, etc.).  = Perhaps such gradations of use already exist. I don't know.  Because ILL is = a separate unit in our library, I have very little to do with what goes on = there. I have, however, spoken with them about the issue of getting copies of = videos that we owned but were lost, stolen or damaged and are not available for = sale from other libraries (so we could make a legal copy) and was told that = ILL departments often can make special loan agreements on a case by case = basis for things like this (to borrow an out of print video from a library that = usually doesn't loan videos in order to make a legal copy in house). 

Does VRT make recommendations to national ILL groups?  How much = control do other media librarians have over whether or not their collections are = loaned out through ILL?  If you have had control over this and have not = allowed your collection to be loaned out, why not?  What are the issues/impediments?  Are there horror stories of what has happened = when titles were loaned out, even with strict limitations on their use?

Thanks,

mb

Michael Brewer
Slavic Studies, German Studies & Media Arts Librarian
University of Arizona Library A210
1510 E. University
P.O. Box 210055
Tucson, AZ 85721
Voice: 520.307.2771
Fax: 520.621.9733
brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu

-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu [mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Bergman, Barbara J
Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2005 4:11 PM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: RE: [Videolib] lending video and film


Most of you have heard my pro-ILL soapbox speech before but...

We starting lending 3 years ago. It's been a very positive experience. =
As we all know, video collections are expensive. No library can possibly = own every video any more than it can have afford every book.

We lend videos with minimal restrictions. (The one unbreakable = restriction is that it doesn't go out if there's an upcoming booking.)
We follow a reciprocal borrowing/lending policy in that we only borrow = material types that they will lend and vice versa. This is fairly common for ILL (especially when it comes to charging a fee for lending). In = translation: We only lend videos to requesting libraries who allow us access to their = videos in exchange. 
The first year, we compiled a list of all titles loaned and borrowed -- = it was a fascinating mix of educational titles and feature films. We've = consistently borrowed twice as many videos as we've lent each semester.
---------
Re: older formats. We will lend 16mm films on a case-by-case basis. Most = of the time when ILL staff replies with "Did you know this is a 16mm = film?" the response is "never mind I thought it was a = videotape..."

-------------
For policy, the VRT and ACRL have published guidelines that suggest = video ILL  practices:

Guidelines for Media Resources in Academic Libraries (1999) http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/guidelinesmedi= a.htm

5.1 Media resources should be accessible through resource sharing, in accordance with the ALA Video Round Table Guidelines for the = Interlibrary Loan of Audiovisual Formats.
Commentary: Many libraries treat media collections as special = collections and prohibit their interlibrary loan. However, library users benefit when = media collections are included in resource-sharing programs. No library can = meet all of its users' needs for media resources, but libraries are reluctant to = lend to our users if we do not lend to their users. The guidelines recognize = that some materials may be excluded, but in general, there is no reason to exclude = entire formats from interlibrary lending.

VRT Guidelines for the Interlibrary Loan of Audiovisual Formats (1997)http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/pubguidelines/guidelinesinterlibrary.htm=

 
------------

Barb Bergman
Media Services Librarian
Minnesota State University-Mankato
(507) 389-5945           = ;      

_______________________________________________
Videolib mailing list
Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib

_______________________________________________
Videolib mailing list
Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

****

"Movies are poems, a holy bible, the great mother of us."
            &= nbsp;  --Ted Berrigan

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