Re: [Videolib] Previewing videos

Herownword@aol.com
Sun, 3 Apr 2005 14:13:20 EDT

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We also need to preview each new "batch" of dubs for all the same reasons
librarians have been mentioning: to be sure it's the correct show (i.e., that
the outside case label and the cassette label actually denote the show that
is on the tape); to be sure that the closed captions are present and have no
mistakes; to check sound quality and picture quality; etc. We obviously
cannot preview every single dub all the way through before sending it out, but we
do watch one copy of each new batch before putting the rest into stock. I
used to do all of this previewing/quality control myself, but I now delegate
the task. I've found that it's something that students (in my case interns;
perhaps you have student hourlies or other workers) love to do. I take a few
minutes to teach them what to look for and then turn them loose to watch the
entire program by themselves (with the closed captions on). I give them
good-quality headphones so they can watch the programs even with other people in
the room without disturbing them. They think it's a real perk and are
grateful for the opportunity to watch the programs. They also take a great deal of
pride in finding errors of any kind. I recently had an intern find some
scrambled closed captioning toward the end of a program and was she ever proud of
herself! So if you really, really can't spare regular staff time for
previewing, I recommend you think about using students for this task. I sometimes
even have two different students watch two different dubs of the same new
batch. It adds an extra set of eyes and ears and, again, makes their job more
interesting.

Jocelyn Riley
HerOwnWords.com
NontraditionalCareers.com

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We also need to preview each new "batch" of dubs for all the same reaso= ns=20 librarians have been mentioning:  to be sure it's the correct show (i.e= .,=20 that the outside case label and the cassette label actually denote the show=20= that=20 is on the tape); to be sure that the closed captions are present and have no= =20 mistakes; to check sound quality and picture quality; etc.  We obviousl= y=20 cannot preview every single dub all the way through before sending it out, b= ut=20 we do watch one copy of each new batch before putting the rest into stock.&n= bsp;=20 I used to do all of this previewing/quality control myself, but I now delega= te=20 the task.  I've found that it's something that students (in my case=20 interns; perhaps you have student hourlies or other workers) love to do.&nbs= p; I=20 take a few minutes to teach them what to look for and then turn them loose t= o=20 watch the entire program by themselves (with the closed captions on). =20= I=20 give them good-quality headphones so they can watch the programs even with o= ther=20 people in the room without disturbing them.  They think it's a real per= k=20 and are grateful for the opportunity to watch the programs.  They also=20= take=20 a great deal of pride in finding errors of any kind.  I recently had an= =20 intern find some scrambled closed captioning toward the end of a program and= was=20 she ever proud of herself!  So if you really, really can't spare regula= r=20 staff time for previewing, I recommend you think about using students for th= is=20 task.  I sometimes even have two different students watch two different= =20 dubs of the same new batch.  It adds an extra set of eyes and ears and,= =20 again, makes their job more interesting.
 
Jocelyn Riley
HerOwnWords.com
NontraditionalCareers.com
 
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