Re: [Videolib] Video Furnace Service/Technology

Stephen O'Riordan (soriordan@ucsd.edu)
Thu, 03 Feb 2005 08:49:40 -0800

Gary & all,

These folks will be giving us a demo, here at UCSD, tomorrow. I'll pass on
anything interesting.

Stephen

At 04:30 PM 2/2/2005 -0800, you wrote:
>We've recently talked to these guys. The system they're pitching to do it
>yourself is very interesting but costy (over 60 grand)
>
>Apparently UCLA, Northwestern, and Dartmouth are doing something with the
>system. You might contact them.
>
>Gary
>
>03:35 PM 2/2/2005 -0700, you wrote:
>
>>All,
>>
>>
>>
>>Do any of you know about this company and their service of digitizing and
>>serving streaming video through an intranet? I spoke with a
>>representative the other day, and it sounded very promising. However, the
>>only legal use I can think of would be for TEACH act purposes (things put
>>on reserve or streamed for distance learning), and, in some cases, in
>>class (I can't recall if it is legal to move something from analog to
>>digital for using in class. It is ok to do this for TEACH act as long as
>>it is not piracy protected). He said that Northwestern, Dartmouth and
>>UCLA were all implementing. I am just wondering if anyone knows about
>>this company or how libraries might be using this kind of service. It
>>seems that for much of what we offer (students viewing films for
>>research, but not necessarily conforming with TEACH act guidelines) would
>>not allow for this kind of digitization. Do others share this reasoning?
>>(I have written to Northwestern and Dartmouth separately to ask them what
>>their intended use is).
>>
>>
>>
>>Here is what the company says it does:
>>
>>
>>
>>Some of the key features of our technology, particularly for library
>>usage, include:
>> * High quality, MPEG 1,2, or 4 standard encoding, to avoid "digital
>> rust" due to proprietary encoding schemes.
>> * Secure, encrypted streams with no caching on end-user machines, to
>> safely deliver video to end-users and prevent digital thievery of the
>> content.
>> * Complete conditional access controls on content viewing and
>> creation, so only authorized users are given access to the content.
>> * Complete meta-data indexing (currently following the Dublin Core
>> standard) for all assets, including a fully searchable indexed database
>> of assets.
>> * No end-user player installation necessary. Using a Windows, Mac, or
>> Linux machine, they simply click a portal page link (for instance, a
>> link in a CMS or electronic card catalogue page) to start watching their
>> video asset. No need to provide installation instructions or patching
>> guidelines or the like; instead they simply watch the video!
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>Here is an article on the company/technology, though it really doesn't
>>hit on the use of digitized video from the libraries collections (which
>>is what interests me).
>>
>>
>>
>>mb
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>Michael Brewer
>>
>>Slavic Studies, German Studies & Media Arts Librarian
>>
>>University of Arizona Library A210
>>
>>1510 E. University
>>
>>P.O. Box 210055
>>
>>Tucson, AZ 85721
>>
>>Voice: 520.307.2771
>>
>>Fax: 520.621.9733
>>
>><mailto:brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu>brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu
>>
>>
>
>Gary Handman
>Director
>Media Resources Center
>Moffitt Library
>UC Berkeley
>ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
>http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC
>
>****
>
>"Movies are poems, a holy bible, the great mother of us."
> --Ted Berrigan

Stephen 0'Riordan
UCSD Libraries / Film & Video Library
9500 Gilman dr
La Jolla, CA 92093-0175Q
tel: (858) 534-7981
fax: (858) 534-0189
e-mail: soriordan@ucsd.edu
http://orpheus.ucsd.edu/fvl/FVLPAGE.HTM

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