Re: [Videolib] Preservation/Security copies (again)

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Mon, 24 Jan 2005 15:41:08 -0800

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woah woah hold it!

Section 108 DOES NOT (repeat after me) make provisions for borrowing a copy
of a work that the library ONCE OWNED (but which went belly) up for the
purposes of making a replacement. The law allows libraries to make copies
of materials in their current collections which are physically at risk and
for which no replacement is available or to transfer titles which are no
longer playable with commonly available technology. The copy may be put
into play -- the original may not.

I think you'd be on way thin ice making copies of another institution's
better condition video...

Gary

At 03:24 PM 1/24/2005 -0700, you wrote:

>All,
>
>
>
>I heard from very few people about the preservation/security copy issue,
>which makes me wonder...
>
>
>
>I am wondering if any of you have actually used this exemption at any
>point (the exemption which allows libraries to get a copy of a damaged or
>lost item from another institution), or if any of you have made a copy of
>a video for another library that was using this exemption. If so, I would
>love to hear about it.
>
>
>
>It is hard for me to believe that no library out there has ever lost or
>damaged an out of print video. On the other hand, I also don't want to
>believe that no media librarian out there has ever had the 1) knowledge,
>and 2) perseverance to actually use this exemption in order to get a copy
>of a video from another institution.
>
>
>
>If this, indeed, is the case, that this exemption is not being used to
>provide our customers with items that we legally purchased, and which we
>have every right to duplicate (or request a duplicate from another
>institution), it is really too bad.
>
>
>
>I think that as a group we might want to figure out some sort of process
>(and agreement) for providing one another copies of videos, when all the
>terms required of this exemption are met (1. legal copy was once owned by
>the requesting institution; 2. it is now lost, stolen, or damaged; 3. the
>video is not available for purchase "at a reasonable price").
>
>
>
>I don't yet belong to VRT (I am fairly new to the Media Arts portion of my
>job), but perhaps that is the group through which to work on this. Anyone
>else have any ideas, comments, etc?
>
>
>
>mb
>
>
>
>Michael Brewer
>
>Slavic Studies, German Studies & Media Arts Librarian
>
>University of Arizona Library A210
>
>1510 E. University
>
>P.O. Box 210055
>
>Tucson, AZ 85721
>
>Voice: 520.307.2771
>
>Fax: 520.621.9733
>
><mailto:brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu>brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu
>
>

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

****

"Movies are poems, a holy bible, the great mother of us."
--Ted Berrigan
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woah woah hold it!

Section 108 DOES NOT (repeat after me) make provisions for borrowing a copy of a work that the library ONCE OWNED (but which went belly) up for the purposes of making a replacement.  The law allows libraries to make copies of materials in their current collections which are physically at risk and for which no replacement is available or to transfer titles which are no longer playable with commonly available technology.  The copy may be put into play -- the original may not.

I think you'd be on way thin ice making copies of another institution's better condition video...

Gary


At 03:24 PM 1/24/2005 -0700, you wrote:

All,

 

I heard from very few people about the preservation/security copy issue, which makes me wonder... 

 

I am wondering if any of you have actually used this exemption at any point (the exemption which allows libraries to get a copy of a damaged or lost item from another institution), or if any of you have made a copy of a video for another library that was using this exemption.  If so, I would love to hear about it.

 

It is hard for me to believe that no library out there has ever lost or damaged an out of print video.  On the other hand, I also don't want to believe that no media librarian out there has ever had the 1) knowledge, and 2) perseverance to actually use this exemption in order to get a copy of a video from another institution.

 

If this, indeed, is the case, that this exemption is not being used to provide our customers with items that we legally purchased, and which we have every right to duplicate (or request a duplicate from another institution), it is really too bad. 

 

I think that as a group we might want to figure out some sort of process (and agreement) for providing one another copies of videos, when all the terms required of this exemption are met (1. legal copy was once owned by the requesting institution; 2. it is now lost, stolen, or damaged; 3. the video is not available for purchase "at a reasonable price").

 

I don't yet belong to VRT (I am fairly new to the Media Arts portion of my job), but perhaps that is the group through which to work on this.  Anyone else have any ideas, comments, etc?

 

mb

 

Michael Brewer

Slavic Studies, German Studies & Media Arts Librarian

University of Arizona Library A210

1510 E. University

P.O. Box 210055

Tucson, AZ 85721

Voice: 520.307.2771

Fax: 520.621.9733

brewerm@u.library.arizona.edu

 

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

****

"Movies are poems, a holy bible, the great mother of us."
               --Ted Berrigan

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