RE: [Videolib] borrowing fees for videos

Syp, Marc P. (MSyp@slpl.lib.mo.us)
Tue, 9 Nov 2004 16:31:16 -0600

I don't think that I'm alone in saying that regardless of whether you agree
with charging for media or not, $1 per day is bordering on insane. This is
in many cases more expensive than your local Hollywood or Blockbuster. The
SLPL used to charge $1 for 7 days, but it was dropped. This was before I
arrived, so I don't know the rationale, but I would assume that it was less
a circulation issue than it was a fairness issue and a desire to maintain
our services as completely and totally free to the public. I personally
would not go back to charging for access to media, though it's not a fight I
will have to fight because we have no plans of doing so.

Thanks,
Marc Syp
Supervisor, Film Library
St. Louis Public Library
314.206.6704

-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu]On Behalf Of Frame, Steve
Sent: Tuesday, November 09, 2004 2:29 PM
To: 'videolib@library.berkeley.edu'
Subject: RE: [Videolib] borrowing fees for videos

The Torrance Public Library does not charge for any audio visual material.

Previously TPL charged $1 per day to check out videos. In 2001 the Library
eliminated that daily fee. One of the rationales for that decision is that
there really is no difference between video - specifically feature films -
and fiction books. They are both used as entertainment. In addition,
non-fiction videos were not being used because patrons would not pay to use
them. Thus, we decided we to eliminate the barrier - namely the daily use
fee - which greatly limited the use of the video collection.

Since 2001 the average monthly circulation for videos has increased from
approximately 900 to nearly 15,000. Clearly, the video fees greatly reduced
the number of videos checked out. A large percentage of the items checked
out are now non-fiction titles which were rarely used when patrons were
required to pay for their use. There is, however, a larger fine if
videos/DVDs are returned late - 1 dollar per day versus .25 cents - which
has more than made up for the loss of revenue for charging a daily fee for
the use of videos.

Remember that fees are barriers to use whether we realize that fact or not.

Steve Frame
Senior Librarian
Torrance Public Library,
Henderson Branch

-----Original Message-----
From: Sarah Beasley [mailto:beasleys@carnegielibrary.org]
Sent: Tuesday, November 09, 2004 8:52 AM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] borrowing fees for videos

Hi All,

I am sure this topic has been discussed before, but I couldn't find anything
in the archives.

We are beginning a discussion about the possibility of charging a small
borrowing fee for feature films. I'm interested in hearing from other
public libraries that charge for videos. How much do you charge? Do you
charge for everything in the collection? If not, what do you charge for and
how do you define what falls into that category? If you have a written
statement/policy that you are willing to share, I'd love to see a copy.

Thanks!

Sarah Beasley
Manager, Film and Audio Department
Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
4400 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
412.622.1918
beasleys@carnegielibrary.org

The views, opinions, and judgments expressed in this message are solely
those of the author. The message contents have not been reviewed or
approved by the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

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