[Videolib] copyright notices

LeeAnne Krause (LLKRAUSE@gwm.sc.edu)
Thu, 07 Oct 2004 11:53:19 -0400

It's not our job to follow our patrons out of the office and personally
police their usage of library materials. With that said, however, many
people will in all good intentions ask what they may do with our
materials, and a good many are unaware of the necessity to limit their
university use face-to-face classroom settings. They're not dumb;
they're just thinking about their research presentation on the
institutional dynamics of the political party system in Great Britain,
and not about fair use.

It happens a couple of times a year that someone will conversationally
tell me that they plan to show something at a presentation at another
venue, or at the international festival, or a student club, what have
you. At this point, it IS our job to inform our patrons of copyright
restrictions. Some folks don't like to hear this, but my response
always is, "Well, I doubt the FBI is going to be kicking your door down
over this, but I could lose MY job if I knowingly allow improper use of
university materials."

We do stick a notice inside our cases, just for CYA purposes, and some
people do contact us for elaboration. Regardless, I think all film
libraries should have a posted copyright notice on their web presence.

IMO, LeeAnne

LeeAnne L. Krause, Manager
Educational Films Collection
University of South Carolina
803-777-0322

>>> JedH@internetvideoarchive.com 10/7/2004 10:48:18 AM >>>
As long as we're talking copyrights. It doesn't applies to
presidential a
debate which is the underlying 'fact'. It barely applies to the
broadcast
which is the 'expression' because it is so minimal an addition and
done
using public airways and common feed. Why would there be any limit?
Why
would it matter if you sold burgers and beer in the commons or
generated
money some other way? This in particular is the stuff of our
democracy, you
should be able to remix it anyway you want.

BTW I think, Jessica is on the money regarding Notices and the
responsibility to police. Not your job.

-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu]On Behalf Of Mary
Seligman
Sent: Thursday, October 07, 2004 8:30 AM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: Re: [Videolib] copyright notices

As long as we're talking video copyright, some teachers were
interested in
taping the presidential debates and showing them in the student
commons.
Students can spend free time here, and there is no face-to-face
instruction.
I'm guessing it's OK as long as the tape does not include the
network
pre-debate talk or post-debate analysis. The debate itself comes to
all
networks through a single video feed, and is likely considered what the
FCC
would call 'public service announcements.' Since there is no economic
gain
to be had from this broadcast, I'm thinking this passes all the
criteria for
fair use. The tape would not be shown after the 10 day limit.
Any thoughts?
Mary Seligman
Library Media Specialist
Paul D. Schreiber High School
Port Washington, NY

videolib@library.berkeley.edu writes:
Well if you are concerned about feature films I wouldn't be.
Virtually
any feature film will have the standard notice on the front of the
film
(F.B.I warning) Even the ones I sell WITH PPR have this as I can't
make a
special batch and the license comes separately. Unless you have a
specific
reason to believe student group or prof would be showing it publicly it
is
not your responsibility to police this and you won't be liable if they
violate copyright by showing it.
It would be their problem
--
Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com
212-629-6880

From: Deborah Benrubi <benrubi@usfca.edu>
Reply-To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Date: Wed, 06 Oct 2004 16:49:14 -0700
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] copyright notices

Dear Video-libbers,

This is my first posting to this list so please be gentle! I looked
in the
archives and couldn't find anything about copyright notices. Here's my
question:

The videos in our smallish collection have been acquired for class
instruction, so we haven't been worried about purchasing public
performance
rights, but as our collection grows and becomes more popular we're
concerned
about possible public use (non face-to-face-in-a-classroom) by profs
or
students. What, if anything, do other academic libraries do? Do any
libraries place copyright notices on those circulating videos that did
not
come with public performance rights? If you have such a notice will
you
share the wording?

Your input is greatly appreciated. Thank you!

Deborah Benrubi
Technical Services Librarian
University of San Francisco
Gleeson Library|Geschke Center
2130 Fulton St.
San Francisco, CA 94117

PHONE (415) 422-5672 / FAX (415) 422-2233 or 422-5062
EMAIL <benrubi@usfca.edu>