RE: [Videolib] Cataloging Foreign Language Feature Films

Konkel, Mary (Konkel@cdnet.cod.edu)
Thu, 27 May 2004 12:15:41 -0500

As a cataloger and also a media librarian I am cringing at the concept
of not viewing the the actual item (A BIG NO NO for a cataloger) in
order to catalog it. As a Library with a very
large video collection, we find numerous occasions of what is in the
box, is not what is on the container. Also, if you don't view, how do
you know that things are closed-captioned, have additional languages, or
that the video is damaged? It is imperative to use the title of the item
itself, even if it is in a foreign language. The capability of adding
lots of other title access points to cover container, disc, accompanying
material, popular, or any other title is easily done. Most online
catalog systems have provisions to index these other titles as well, so
it wouldn't matter whether your user put in the original foreign title
or the commonly known English title, they would still find the item in
your catalog if you owned it. If you are not currently using such MARC
fields as 246, 730, 740 in your cataloging, you should investigate and
question why and if your library systems vendor does not accomodate
indexing for these additional title fields, you should ask why not. I
would hope that you wouldn't be using a national utility like OCLC or
RLIN to input original cataloging records, because using a 245 primary
title that was not the ACTUAL title is definitely against practice. As
you can tell,
I am a bit passionate about this issue and hope it doesn't sound like I
am anti-public service,
as that is entirely the opposite-- we catalog for the user and make
heavy use of additional titles to accomodate popular titles, especially
for foreign language materials. I offer the 3rd commandment from my
media cataloging teaching presentation:

3.Thou Shalt NOT Catalog from the Container Alone
*View the actual item- the title screen, credits, labels, etc.
are the chief source of information for cataloging, NOT the box
*The container's primary reason for being is its PR content.
You may use the container as a secondary source.
*Compile the most complete information about
the item using all available sources.

======================
Mary S. Konkel
Assistant Professor
Head of Technical Services
College of DuPage
Library SRC 3038A
425 Fawell Blvd.
Glen Ellyn, IL 60137-6599
Voice: (630) 942-2662
Fax: (630) 858-8757
E-mail: konkel@cdnet.cod.edu


-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Herbert, Rue
Sent: Thursday, May 27, 2004 10:41 AM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: RE: [Videolib] Cataloging Foreign Language Feature Films

In looking at our catalog, we seem to have entries both ways. However,
patrons can search the online catalog by title in either Engligh or the
original language, and the entry will come up showing both titles.

Rue M. Herbert
Media Resources
Tampa Library
University of South Florida

-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu]On Behalf Of Holly Sammons
Sent: Thursday, May 27, 2004 9:16 AM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] Cataloging Foreign Language Feature Films

Before I ask my question, let me preface it by saying I am NOT a
cataloger! But I am having a cataloging battle.

I'd like my foreign language videos (dvd's and vc's)to be cataloged with
the primary title being English and the additional title in the language
the film was made (making it more user friendly). For instance, the
film "Shower" would have that as the primary title, and the Chinese
title, "Xi zao" would be the additional title.

My contention is that the average patron would search for "Shower" not
"Xi zao"!!! I know the general rule about title page, but with a video
there is no way a patron can view the "title page" without putting it in
a machine! And often there is NOTHING on the container that says the
foreign language title. Titles on video packages are often in English.

Is this reasonable? How do other libraries do it? My library's catalog
is so user unfriendly that this detail makes an enormous difference.

Thanks in advance.

-- 
Holly Sammons, Librarian
Onondaga County Public Library
447 So Salina St
Syracuse NY  13202
315-435-1894

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