Re: [Videolib] closed captioning on videos

MileFilms@aol.com
Wed, 26 May 2004 14:37:59 EDT

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In a message dated 5/26/04 1:59:37 PM, jibaker@sdccd.cc.ca.us writes:
> Jessica,
> What about passing the cost on to the customer?=A0 If it costs $500 for yo=
u to
> caption a video, then raise the price by $2 or $3 or even $10 per video an=
d
> recoup it that way.=A0 I would gladly pay extra to get a captioned video.=
=A0 I
> think that others would be willing to do this too.=A0 I know it would be a=
n
> added burden for the distributors, but more and more of us are being
> required to purchase only captioned videos, and your consumer pool will be
> shrinking.=A0
> Thanks,
> Jill Baker
> AV Librarian
> San Diego Mesa College
>=20

Like Kino, we only have 24 titles out of about 100 that would need=20
closed-captioning, but those 24 are lacking them not because we are heartles=
s fiends or=20
unaware of the current legal requirements (and I know Jill, that you're not=20
suggesting this, of course). I'm sure Jessica feels just as guilty about it=20=
as I=20
do.

It's very, very hard to add extra retail cost for a feature film to what=20
already is a very small market. It's an extremely competitive business when=20=
you=20
can buy MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS, THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD or NIGHT AT THE O=
PERA=20
for as little as $10. For Kino and Milestone, where many of our films are=20
$24.95 and $29.95, we have to price them even at this "high" price because a=
sale=20
of 2000 DVDs of a silent or "obscure" classic title is considered a huge suc
cess and costs of production are higher because of preservation and producti=
on=20
costs (a score for a silent film alone can cost anywhere from $500 to=20
$20,000). Many of them sell in the only 500 to 1000 range.

In some ways, the very cheap pricing for video has been a boon for the=20
consumer and the educational market, but less so for the independent for-pro=
fit=20
distributor. In regards to closed-captioning, lost sales versus higher price=
=20
presents a Catch-22.

And I'm not sure I've mentioned this before (I'm sure I have) but a=20
surprisingly low percentage of our DVD sales are to schools and libraries. I=
t's almost=20
60 to 70% to individual buyers. Jessica and I should talk amongst ourselves=20
about it, but I'd be curious to know what the percentage of schools and=20
libraries bought her early women filmmakers series, because ours was fairly=20=
small for=20
our Equal Time series.

Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
Fax: (201) 767-3035
Email: milefilms@aol.com
Website: http://www.milestonefilms.com

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In a message dated 5/26/04 1:59:37 PM, jibaker@sdccd.cc.ca.us writes:

Jessica,
What about passing the cost on to the customer?=A0 If it costs $500 for you=20= to
caption a video, then raise the price by $2 or $3 or even $10 per video and<= BR> recoup it that way.=A0 I would gladly pay extra to get a captioned video.= =A0 I
think that others would be willing to do this too.=A0 I know it would be an<= BR> added burden for the distributors, but more and more of us are being
required to purchase only captioned videos, and your consumer pool will be shrinking.=A0
Thanks,
Jill Baker
AV Librarian
San Diego Mesa College


Like Kino, we only have 24 titles out of about 100 that would need closed-ca= ptioning, but those 24 are lacking them not because we are heartless fiends=20= or unaware of the current legal requirements (and I know Jill, that you're n= ot suggesting this, of course). I'm sure Jessica feels just as guilty about=20= it as I do.

It's very, very hard to add extra retail cost for a feature film to what=20= already is a very small market. It's an extremely competitive business when=20= you can buy MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS, THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD or NIGHT AT T= HE OPERA for as little as $10. For Kino and Milestone, where many of our fil= ms are $24.95 and $29.95, we have to price them even at this "high" price be= cause a sale of 2000 DVDs of a silent or "obscure" classic title is consider= ed a huge success and costs of production are higher because of preservation= and production costs (a score for a silent film alone can cost anywhere fro= m $500 to $20,000). Many of them sell in the only 500 to 1000 range.

In some ways, the very cheap pricing for video has been a boon for the consu= mer and the educational market, but less so for the independent for-profit d= istributor. In regards to closed-captioning, lost sales versus higher price=20= presents a Catch-22.

And I'm not sure I've mentioned this before (I'm sure I have) but a surprisi= ngly low percentage of our DVD sales are to schools and libraries. It's almo= st 60 to 70% to individual buyers. Jessica and I should talk amongst ourselv= es about it, but I'd be curious to know what the percentage of schools and l= ibraries bought her early women filmmakers series, because ours was fairly s= mall for our Equal Time series.

Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
Fax: (201) 767-3035
Email: milefilms@aol.com
Website: http://www.milestonefilms.com
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