RE: [Videolib] ILL question

Breivold, Scott (SBreivo@exchange.calstatela.edu)
Fri, 30 Apr 2004 14:10:57 -0700

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According to the "Guidelines for Media Resources in Academic Libraries"
prepared by the ACRL Media Resources Committee:
----------
5.1 Media resources should be accessible through resource sharing, in
accordance with the ALA Video Round Table Guidelines for the Interlibrary
Loan of Audiovisual Formats
(http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/pubguidelines/guidelinesinterlibrary.htm)
Commentary: Many libraries treat media collections as special collections
and prohibit their interlibrary loan. However, library users benefit when
media collections are included in resource-sharing programs. No library can
meet all of its users' needs for media resources, but libraries are
reluctant to lend to our users if we do not lend to their users. The
guidelines recognize that some materials may be excluded, but in general,
there is no reason to exclude entire formats from interlibrary lending.
----------

The reality however seems to be that most institutions prefer not to lend
media materials through ILL. For the past several years our library (Cal
State LA) has participated in a special arrangement we call "FLIC" where a
handful of CSU libraries in the southern California area have agreed to lend
media to one another. The use of this service seems to be dwindling
however, and the feeling seems to be emerging that it's more cost effective
to spend our budget on acquiring new titles rather than paying for courier
services to ship them back and forth. It's a tricky issue I think, because
what seems to happen (in my experience with consortial media borrowing) is
that one or two institutions with really great media collections end up
always being the "lender" and they eventually pull out of the agreement
because they can't afford the staff time to process all the requests.

Also, I'd say the reason most media centers shy away from ILL is that we
like to have the majority of our collection in-house and available for
spontaneous use by our students and faculty. All too often our user
(especially faculty) simply do not plan ahead and are shocked when they come
in to check out a video/DVD for use in class and it's not on the shelf.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
Scott Breivold
Media, Communications, & Arts Librarian
Interim Collection Development Librarian
University Library ~ Cal State LA
http://www.calstatela.edu/library/mmc

"I hear and I forget; I see and I remember; I write and I understand."
~Ernst Lubitsch


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RE: [Videolib] ILL question

According to the "Guidelines for Media Resources = in Academic Libraries" prepared by the ACRL Media Resources = Committee:
----------
5.1 Media resources should be accessible through = resource sharing, in accordance with the ALA Video Round Table = Guidelines for the Interlibrary Loan of Audiovisual Formats (http://www.ala.org/ala/vrt/pubguidelines/guidelinesint= erlibrary.htm)

Commentary: Many libraries treat media collections as = special collections and prohibit their interlibrary loan. However, = library users benefit when media collections are included in = resource-sharing programs. No library can meet all of its users' needs = for media resources, but libraries are reluctant to lend to our users = if we do not lend to their users. The guidelines recognize that some = materials may be excluded, but in general, there is no reason to = exclude entire formats from interlibrary lending.

----------

The reality however seems to be that most = institutions prefer not to lend media materials through ILL.  For = the past several years our library (Cal State LA) has participated in a = special arrangement we call "FLIC" where a handful of CSU = libraries in the southern California area have agreed to lend media to = one another.  The use of this service seems to be dwindling = however, and the feeling seems to be emerging that it's more cost = effective to spend our budget on acquiring new titles rather than = paying for courier services to ship them back and forth.  It's a = tricky issue I think, because what seems to happen (in my experience = with consortial media borrowing) is that one or two institutions with = really great media collections end up always being the = "lender" and they eventually pull out of the agreement = because they can't afford the staff time to process all the = requests. 

Also, I'd say the reason most media centers shy away = from ILL is that we like to have the majority of our collection = in-house and available for spontaneous use by our students and = faculty.  All too often our user (especially faculty) simply do = not plan ahead and are shocked when they come in to check out a = video/DVD for use in class and it's not on the shelf. 


=3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D = =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D =3D  
Scott Breivold
Media, Communications, & Arts Librarian
Interim Collection Development Librarian
University Library ~ Cal State LA
http://www.calstatela.edu/library/mmc

"I hear and I forget; I see and I remember; I = write and I understand." 
     ~Ernst Lubitsch






   

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