RE: [Videolib] videocassette damage

Hooft, Robert (RHOOFT@jibc.bc.ca)
Tue, 27 Apr 2004 15:21:11 -0700

Unfortunately, if I would have to check every video that came back after it has been viewed, or before it went out, I wouldn't have time to do anything else in my day. There is no easy way to check a VHS tape.
Because tapes tend to become brittle with age (15 to 20 years)they can snap (we don't blame the patrons if this happens). Tapes can get stretched because of dirty heads and capstans in the VCR, or get caught by pulled the tape out of the machine before the release mechanism kicks in. If the tape is hanging out of it's housing, we have a good argument that it didn't leave the library that way.
Otherwise, we haven't found a reliable way of proving that patrons actually did damage the videos. Usually, we just count our loses.

Rob Hooft
JIBC Library
New Westminster, BC Canada

-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@library.berkeley.edu]On Behalf Of Lisa
Flanzraich
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2004 2:22 PM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] videocassette damage

We are having a major problem with videocassette damage. Can anyone out there
advise on how to "point the finger" so to speak since there seems to be several
ready-made loopholes in the user taking responsibility for damaging the tape--"I
didn't do it; it was already damaged, etc, etc.

Will checking the tape after the viewing help?

Thanks
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