Re: [Videolib] RE: public performance rights

MileFilms@aol.com
Tue, 13 Apr 2004 16:16:00 EDT

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In a message dated 4/13/04 2:28:27 PM, GVENTURA@highline.edu writes:
>=20
> A conscientious student group on campus (not all groups on campus have bee=
n=20
> so proactive in the past) actually asked if they needed public performance=
=20
> rights for a certain title (Inside Mecca) and I did my best to hunt down t=
he=20
> information. (The answer was "no, not available for that title.")
> Once I relayed that info back to the group they stared at me blankly like,=
=20
> "Ok, well, now what?"
> Does anyone have any ideas on what=A0to say in that situation? "You're on=20=
your=20
> own?" "Good luck, don't tell me if you break the law."
> I'd appreciate some better ideas than=A0just staring blankly back at the=20
> library patron.
>=20
Well! Certainly, "don't tell me if you break the law" is not the best=20
answer!!!

"I'm sorry, but it happens" is a very good response (see below for even=20
better). I don't know if it's the by-product of an affluent society or the=20
proliferation of the internet culture, but the concept that EVERYTHING shoul=
d be=20
available under all circumstances is a lovely utopian concept. That's okay a=
nd it's=20
something to strive for. As a closet socialist, I'm willing to have the=20
Government support me so I can supply every one of our films for free. :-)=20

But the concept that if something is not available today, then it's okay to=20
break the law, is a dangerous one.

Two reasons not to play it without PPR.=20
1) It's unethical (it's also illegal, but I like to think morality come=
s=20
up for consideration first and foremost)
2) Who says the company didn't have its reasons? If a distributor who=20
does not own the PPR sells a videotape to a college and it's used improperly=
, it=20
can cause them problems with the producer. Trust me.

BETTER YET, you can give the name and phone number of the distributor to the=
=20
student and let them talk to the person there. It might lead to a better=20
understanding of the situation and perhaps a solution to the problem.

BEST YET, help the student find another film or video that can serve the=20
student's needs instead of the film they can't have. It's the wonderful serv=
ice=20
that librarians do every day of the year. When a filmmaker calls me and says=
he=20
can't get a film clip or piece of music he desperately wants and what should=
=20
he do, I suggest he gets rid of his or her preconceived notion and think=20
imaginatively. It almost ALWAYS works out better than the original plans.

Secondly,=20

Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
Fax: (201) 767-3035
Email: milefilms@aol.com
Website: http://www.milestonefilms.com

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In a message dated 4/13/04 2:28:27 PM, GVENTURA@highline.edu writes:


A conscientious student group on campus (not all groups on campus have been=20= so proactive in the past) actually asked if they needed public performance r= ights for a certain title (Inside Mecca) and I did my best to hunt down the=20= information. (The answer was "no, not available for that title.")
Once I relayed that info back to the group they stared at me blankly like, "= Ok, well, now what?"
Does anyone have any ideas on what=A0to say in that situation? "You're on yo= ur own?" "Good luck, don't tell me if you break the law."
I'd appreciate some better ideas than=A0just staring blankly back at the li= brary patron.

Well! Certainly, "don't tell me if you break the law" is not the best answer= !!!

"I'm sorry, but it happens" is a very good response (see below for even bett= er). I don't know if it's the by-product of an affluent society or the proli= feration of the internet culture, but the concept that EVERYTHING should be=20= available under all circumstances is a lovely utopian concept. That's okay a= nd it's something to strive for. As a closet socialist, I'm willing to have=20= the Government support me so I can supply every one of our films for free. := -)

But the concept that if something is not available today, then it's okay to=20= break the law, is a dangerous one.


Two reasons not to play it without PPR.
     1) It's unethical (it's also illegal, but I like to= think morality comes up for consideration first and foremost)
     2) Who says the company didn't have its reasons? If= a distributor who does not own the PPR sells a videotape to a college and i= t's used improperly, it can cause them problems with the producer. Trust me.=

BETTER YET, you can give the name and phone number of the distributor to the= student and let them talk to the person there. It might lead to a better un= derstanding of the situation and perhaps a solution to the problem.

BEST YET, help the student find another film or video that can serve the stu= dent's needs instead of the film they can't have. It's the wonderful service= that librarians do every day of the year. When a filmmaker calls me and say= s he can't get a film clip or piece of music he desperately wants and what s= hould he do, I suggest he gets rid of his or her preconceived notion and thi= nk imaginatively. It almost ALWAYS works out better than the original plans.=

Secondly,

Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
Fax: (201) 767-3035
Email: milefilms@aol.com
Website: http://www.milestonefilms.com
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