[Videolib] videos on hard sciences

LeeAnne Krause (LLKRAUSE@gwm.sc.edu)
Wed, 24 Mar 2004 15:49:04 -0500

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Hello!
I have an open-ended question and would like your input. We've
recently moved our film collection to a much more central location in
the university, which has increased our circulation. In the past, I
based my acquisitions pretty heavily on specific requests by established
patrons. The theory behind this is, with limited resources, it's best
to use these resources on items that we know will definitely be used.
Well, we're facing a crossroads in collection management, because most
of the needs of our core group of patrons have been met, and now we're
getting more interest by random patrons who now stumble across us. This
is how it came to my attention that we could use more materials in the
hard sciences. We have lots in social sciences, but not AS much in
Geography, Geology, Biology, Chemistry, general Medicine (the Nursing
and Medical schools have their own collections), etc.

I do want to make wise choices with these materials, so I would LOVE
your input! What are some high quality science videos that you have in
your collections, suitable for college libraries, that WON'T become
obsolete by the time it hits the shelves?

Feel free to respond off-list.

Thanks in advance,
LeeAnne


LeeAnne L. Krause, Manager
Educational Film Library
Thomas Cooper Library
803-777-0322




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Hello!
I have an open-ended question and would like your input.  We've recently moved our film collection to a much more central location in the university, which has increased our circulation.  In the past, I based my acquisitions pretty heavily on specific requests by established patrons.  The theory behind this is, with limited resources, it's best to use these resources on items that we know will definitely be used.  Well, we're facing a crossroads in collection management, because most of the needs of our core group of patrons have been met, and now we're getting more interest by random patrons who now stumble across us.  This is how it came to my attention that we could use more materials in the hard sciences.  We have lots in social sciences, but not AS much in Geography, Geology, Biology, Chemistry, general Medicine (the Nursing and Medical schools have their own collections), etc. 
 
I do want to make wise choices with these materials, so I would LOVE your input!  What are some high quality science videos that you have in your collections, suitable for college libraries, that WON'T become obsolete by the time it hits the shelves?
 
Feel free to respond off-list.
 
Thanks in advance,
LeeAnne
 
 
LeeAnne L. Krause, Manager
Educational Film Library
Thomas Cooper Library
803-777-0322
 
 
 

 
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