Re: [Videolib] What about lowering Public Performance Rights

Jessica Rosner (jrosner@kino.com)
Thu, 18 Mar 2004 15:54:22 -0500

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Well don't faint but I agree with Gary. I think PPR should be on as needed
basis.
As I have stated MANY times before even if you had ALL THE MONEY and ALL THE
TIME in the world I doubt you could get PPR on 1/3 of your collection. Many
rights holders will not do it , others are too difficult to track down. I am
of course most familiar with the situation for
FEATURE films but unless you really MUST show the film publicly or broadcast
it, you don't need PPR. Now I have an average of 5 or 10 PPR screenings I
license every week but this
is for a SPECIFIC public showing so it makes sense.
Other than a Public Library which might want to have a small collection it
can just
pull out for programming buying PPR for anything other than a specific use
is not
very practical or cost effective

-- 
Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com
212-629-6880

From: Gary Handman <ghandman@library.berkeley.edu> Reply-To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2004 10:21:42 -0800 To: joel@microcinema.com, videolib@library.berkeley.edu Subject: Re: [Videolib] What about lowering Public Performance Rights licenses?

Thanks for sending this out, Joel.

Here's the deal: the vast (and I mean vast) majority of libraries collecting video simply DO NOT NEED PUBLIC PERFORMANCE RIGHTS! Certainly, any public library not in the business of programming (i.e. publicly exhibiting) the materials in their collection do not need PPR. In academic libraries, by far the most common uses of video are 1) in connection with face-to-face teaching, and thereby covered by fair use and 2) viewing by individuals within the library (and often in connection with coursework -- in other words, probably covered by fair use also).

I think that for libraries that DO need PPRs, taking on a flat $25 is EXTREMELY reasonable.

At 09:22 AM 3/18/2004, you wrote: Hello everyone,

I would like to hear your honest opinion/feedback about a topic which is very relevant to all of us: Public Performance Rights license fees.

We launched our Blackchair DVD Collection in mid December. We service direct to consumer and retail, but we also are gaining a very strong client base in the educational/institutional markets.

We distribute FOUR titles on DVD where the Retail price and the PPR price are exactly the same ($25-$30 depending on the title). This pricing structure was demanded by the producers of the DVD's who intentionally wanted to keep the price fair so the works could be accessible across the board.

Furthermore, we have a couple of titles with a PPR of $50, only $20 over the SRP.

finally, we have a few titles with a PPR of around $60-$75 or $30-$50 over SRP.

Here's what we are seeing - there has been a HUGE (!) rush by educators/librarians to buy the low priced titles. The second most popular purchases are the ones that around $50 and the third most popular are those around the $75 range.

The titles we have at $100-$125 barely sell at all.

So we are experiencing a very obvious trend here, and it has got us wondering if we should be talking to all of our producers/labels about LOWERING their pricing, and/or putting a cap on their PPR pricing.

Three possible scenarios: 1. keep PPR and SRP the same. 2. Whatever the SRP, add on a flat $25 for PPR license 3. Similar to #2, whatever the SRP, simply bump the PPR up to a $50.00 cap.

I would very much like to hear your honest input about this because I am also hearing from librarians who are buying our lower priced product a great sigh of relief and a big THANK YOU for offering titles at an affordable rate.

Thank you for your consideration.

Respectfully, Joel

Joel S. Bachar, Founder Microcinema International 531 Utah Street, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA 415-864-0660 www.microcinema.com <http://www.microcinema.com/>

_______________________________________________ Videolib mailing list Videolib@library.berkeley.edu http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib Gary Handman Director Media Resources Center Moffitt Library UC Berkeley ghandman@library.berkeley.edu http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

<http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC> ****

"Movies are poems, a holy bible, the great mother of us." --Ted Berrigan

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Re: [Videolib] What about lowering Public Performance Rights license= s? Well don't faint but I agree with Gary. I think PPR should be on as needed = basis.
As I have stated MANY times before even if you had ALL THE MONEY and ALL TH= E TIME in the world I doubt you could get PPR on 1/3 of your collection. Man= y rights holders will not do it , others are too difficult to track down. I = am of course most familiar with the situation for
FEATURE films but unless you really MUST show the film publicly or broadcas= t it, you don't need PPR.  Now I have an average of 5 or 10  PPR s= creenings I license every week but this
is for a SPECIFIC public showing so it makes sense.
Other than a Public Library which might want to have a small collection it = can just
pull out for programming buying PPR for anything other than a specific use = is not
very practical or cost effective
--
Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com
212-629-6880


From: Gary Handman <ghandman@library.berkeley.edu>
Reply-To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2004 10:21:42 -0800
To: joel@microcinema.com, videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: Re: [Videolib] What about lowering Public Performance Right= s licenses?


Thanks for sending this out, Joel.

Here's the deal:  the vast (and I mean vast) majority of libraries col= lecting video simply DO NOT NEED PUBLIC PERFORMANCE RIGHTS! Certainly, any p= ublic library not in the business of programming (i.e. publicly exhibiting) = the materials in their collection do not need PPR.  In academic librari= es, by far the most common uses of video are
1) in connection with face-to-face teaching, and thereby covered by fair us= e and 2)  viewing by individuals within the library (and often in conne= ction with coursework -- in other words, probably covered by fair use also).=

I think that for libraries that DO need PPRs, taking on a flat $25 is EX= TREMELY reasonable.



At 09:22 AM 3/18/2004, you wrote:
Hello everyone,

I would like to hear your honest opinion/feedback about a topic which
is very relevant to all of us: Public Performance Rights license fees.

We launched our Blackchair DVD Collection in mid December. We service
direct to consumer and retail, but we also are gaining a very strong
client base in the educational/institutional markets.

We distribute FOUR titles on DVD where the Retail price and the PPR
price are exactly the same ($25-$30 depending on the title). This
pricing structure was demanded by the producers of the DVD's who
intentionally wanted to keep the price fair so the works could be
accessible across the board.

Furthermore, we have a couple of titles with a PPR of $50, only $20
over the SRP.

finally, we have a few titles with a PPR of around $60-$75 or $30-$50
over SRP.

Here's what we are seeing - there has been a HUGE (!) rush by
educators/librarians to buy the low priced titles. The second most
popular purchases are the ones that around $50 and the third most
popular are those around the $75 range.

The titles we have at $100-$125 barely sell at all.

So we are experiencing a very obvious trend here, and it has got us
wondering if we should be talking to all of our producers/labels about
LOWERING their pricing, and/or putting a cap on their PPR pricing.

Three possible scenarios:
1. keep PPR and SRP the same.
2. Whatever the SRP, add on a flat $25 for PPR license
3. Similar to #2, whatever the SRP, simply bump the PPR up to a $50.00
cap.

I would very much like to hear your honest input about this because I
am also hearing from librarians who are buying our lower priced
product a great sigh of relief and a big THANK YOU for offering titles
at an affordable rate.

Thank you for your consideration.

Respectfully,
Joel

Joel S. Bachar, Founder
Microcinema International
531 Utah Street, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA
415-864-0660
www.microcinema.com <http://www.microcinema.com/>

_______________________________________________
Videolib mailing list
Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib
Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

<http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC> ****

"Movies are poems, a holy bible, the great mother of us."
            &n= bsp;--Ted Berrigan

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