RE: [Videolib] Seeking recent AP newstory that students download

Breivold, Scott (SBreivo@exchange.calstatela.edu)
Thu, 26 Feb 2004 14:46:28 -0800

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Found this article on the Acadia University website:

Students Pay the Price for Sharing | SHANNON HUGHES

"Excessive" bandwidth-use ends in student losing access

When Matthew Barrett came home from Spring Break, he noticed that his
Internet was missing. The third-year student of Electrical Engineering had
been operating a desktop and laptop computer in his residence room, using
one primarily for school work and one to download copies of television shows
and share them with his 3600 closest friends. After Spring Break, he
received an e-mail stating that his desktop Internet connection had been
revoked.

Barrett's neighbour in residence, William Eisenbarth, had his Internet
access removed for the same reason. Matt Innes of Seminary House had his
laptop Internet connection removed and reinstated on the grounds that he
discontinue the activities contributing to his excessive use of Acadia's
bandwidth.

"An e-mail was sent to him and eight or twelve other people back in
October," one DirectConnect operator, who would rather not be named,
explains. "It said 'you're using too much bandwidth; here are some ways to
reduce that.' A few months later, after the break, he came back and his 'net
was down and he had an e-mail asking him to go in for an interview."

DirectConnect, arguably Acadia's most popular filesharing program, operates
from a computer in Chipman House. The purpose of the program is to share
files among Acadia students on-campus without taking up external bandwidth.
One student downloads a file from an external source, and the remainder of
students on campus can search for that file and acquire it from someone at
Acadia.

"DirectConnect uses internal bandwidth," the anonymous operator says, "so
the University doesn't have to pay for the bandwidth. By 'pay,' I don't mean
there are no costs involved, but the University doesn't have to pay any real
service fees to an external provider to connect to the Internet."

After perusing the Acadia Computing Policies page, Computer Science student
Brandon Uhlman pointed out that "if there was enough traffic going through
these two machines that Computing Services paid attention, then they were
probably starting to affect network performance adversely." Computing
Policies can be viewed online at http://www.acadiau.ca/cs/Policies.html. In
response to the Computing Services policies stating that copyrighted
material may not be shared on Acadia's network without permission, one DC
operator reminds students "we're just providing the medium. If [students]
choose to put up copyrighted material, that's their own fault."

In an ICQ message sent to various students on campus, Barrett attributed his
loss of Internet to "Excess traffic" due to downloading and uploading
television shows. In order to download files, he explained, "you have to
give to receive, meaning that you must supply your TV shows to receive the
latest."
Barrett later elaborated on the Internet loss, explaining that his role with
DirectConnect was not the source of the trouble. "It was because I was
serving television shows to people on the internet using a program called
mIRC."

"The theory behind DC is that instead of having thirty or forty students
download the latest movie from across the country and using up thirty or
forty times that much bandwidth, we just have one person use that external
bandwidth to get it," one student says. He speculates that "the two people
having their stuff cut off were uploading a lot, and I think uploading is
what the University's concerned about - but I don't want to test that
theory."

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RE: [Videolib] Seeking recent AP newstory that students download = their TV viewing

Found this article on the Acadia University = website:

Students Pay the Price for Sharing | SHANNON HUGHES =

"Excessive" bandwidth-use ends in student = losing access

When Matthew Barrett came home from Spring Break, he = noticed that his Internet was missing. The third-year student of = Electrical Engineering had been operating a desktop and laptop computer = in his residence room, using one primarily for school work and one to = download copies of television shows and share them with his 3600 = closest friends. After Spring Break, he received an e-mail stating that = his desktop Internet connection had been revoked.

Barrett's neighbour in residence, William Eisenbarth, = had his Internet access removed for the same reason. Matt Innes of = Seminary House had his laptop Internet connection removed and = reinstated on the grounds that he discontinue the activities = contributing to his excessive use of Acadia's bandwidth.

"An e-mail was sent to him and eight or twelve other = people back in October," one DirectConnect operator, who would rather = not be named, explains. "It said 'you're using too much bandwidth; here = are some ways to reduce that.' A few months later, after the break, he = came back and his 'net was down and he had an e-mail asking him to go = in for an interview."

DirectConnect, arguably Acadia's most popular = filesharing program, operates from a computer in Chipman House. The = purpose of the program is to share files among Acadia students = on-campus without taking up external bandwidth. One student downloads a = file from an external source, and the remainder of students on campus = can search for that file and acquire it from someone at = Acadia.

"DirectConnect uses internal bandwidth," the = anonymous operator says, "so the University doesn't have to pay for the = bandwidth. By 'pay,' I don't mean there are no costs involved, but the = University doesn't have to pay any real service fees to an external = provider to connect to the Internet."

After perusing the Acadia Computing Policies page, = Computer Science student Brandon Uhlman pointed out that "if there was = enough traffic going through these two machines that Computing Services = paid attention, then they were probably starting to affect network = performance adversely." Computing Policies can be viewed online at http://www.acadiau.ca/cs/Policies.html. In = response to the Computing Services policies stating that copyrighted = material may not be shared on Acadia's network without permission, one = DC operator reminds students "we're just providing the medium. If = [students] choose to put up copyrighted material, that's their own = fault."

In an ICQ message sent to various students on campus, = Barrett attributed his loss of Internet to "Excess traffic" due to = downloading and uploading television shows. In order to download files, = he explained, "you have to give to receive, meaning that you must = supply your TV shows to receive the latest."

Barrett later elaborated on the Internet loss, = explaining that his role with DirectConnect was not the source of the = trouble. "It was because I was serving television shows to people on = the internet using a program called mIRC."

"The theory behind DC is that instead of having = thirty or forty students download the latest movie from across the = country and using up thirty or forty times that much bandwidth, we just = have one person use that external bandwidth to get it," one student = says. He speculates that "the two people having their stuff cut off = were uploading a lot, and I think uploading is what the University's = concerned about - but I don't want to test that theory."

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