Re: [Videolib] education & poverty

www.richardcohenfilms.com (rbc24@earthlink.net)
Wed, 21 Jan 2004 13:23:18 -0800

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GOING TO SCHOOL - IR A LA ESCUELA is a documentary about inclusion and
special education services revealing the determination of parents to
make sure their children receive a quality education. you get a strong
sense of how poverty could rob kids of an education, and more. View
some stills from the film (and read some recent comments) at
http://www.richardcohenfilms.com - Richard

"Powerful film...It will force the viewer to re-evaluate their own
position on a variety of things, from the nature of our educational and
social systems to our own beliefs and commitment to diversity and
inclusion. Go to school, see Ir a la Escuela, the children have much to
teach us and we have much to learn."
-JOURNAL OF POVERTY, Alfred Joseph (Prof. of Family Studies & Social
Work, Miami University)

"This is such an important film about the challenges that families of
children with disabilities have in securing special education supports
for their children. The film captures families from different cultural
and economic backgrounds struggling to help their children with a range
of disabilities succeed in school with their non disabled classmates."
--Mary Falvey, Ph.D., Professor, Education Dept., Cal State
University, Los Angeles.

"I showed the film in my Introduction to Sociology Class and got a very
positive response. It dramatizes the issues that we have been
addressing regarding inequalities in education. One student after
seeing "Going To School-Ir a la Escuela" said she wants to become a
special ed teacher. A moving and well-documented film."
- Miliann Kang, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Sociology Department,
Grinnell College

"I co-taught, with a professor, a class on disability culture. I used
this film and it was awesome. As a Latina I want to thank you for doing
a film which incorporated the Latino culture. I live really close to
the border and to show my class that film which they could more
culturally relate to was really cool and highly effective (almost all of
the class was non-disabled). It is one of the best films I've seen on
the issue of schools and accessibility."
-Naomi Ortiz, KASA (Kids As Self Advocates) Arizona, NDSU (National
Disabled Students Union

"Very informative coverage of major issues such as civil rights and
equal access, mainstreaming, knowledge and openness (or lack of it) of
school staffs, emotional/social/cultural factors, and communication
problems. I think every school administrator should see it, as well as
teachers, parents, and also students, since they are the peers of the
kids who are joining the mainstream and need to have as much of their
interaction as possible be positive and supportive. ...excellent
handling of bilingual aspects."
-Ruth E. Andersen, Ph.D., Program Specialist, Children with Special
Health Care Needs Program
Texas Dept. of Health

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GOING TO SCHOOL - IR A LA ESCUELA is a documentary about inclusion and special education services revealing the determination of parents to make sure their children receive a quality education.  you get a strong sense of how poverty could rob kids of an education, and more.  View some stills from the film (and read some recent comments) at  http://www.richardcohenfilms.com    - Richard

"Powerful film...It will force the viewer to re-evaluate their own position on a variety of things, from the nature of our educational and social systems to our own beliefs and commitment to diversity and inclusion.  Go to school, see Ir a la Escuela, the children have much to teach us and we have much to learn."
-JOURNAL OF POVERTY, Alfred Joseph (Prof. of Family Studies & Social Work, Miami University)

"This is such an important film about the challenges that families of children with disabilities have in securing special education supports for their children.  The film captures families from different cultural and economic backgrounds struggling to help their children with a range of disabilities succeed in school with their non disabled classmates."  --Mary Falvey, Ph.D.,  Professor, Education Dept., Cal State University, Los Angeles.

"I showed the film in my Introduction to Sociology Class and got a very positive response.  It dramatizes the issues that we have been addressing regarding inequalities in education.   One student after seeing "Going To School-Ir a la Escuela" said she wants to become a special ed teacher.  A moving and well-documented film."
- Miliann Kang, Ph.D.,  Assistant Professor, Sociology Department, Grinnell College  

"I co-taught, with a professor, a class on disability culture.  I used this film and it was awesome.  As a Latina I want to thank you for doing a film which incorporated the Latino culture.  I live really close to the border and to show my class that film which they could more culturally relate to was really cool and highly effective (almost all of the class was non-disabled). It is one of the best films I've seen on the issue of schools and accessibility."
-Naomi Ortiz,
KASA (Kids As Self Advocates) Arizona, NDSU (National Disabled Students Union

"Very informative coverage of major issues such as civil rights and equal access, mainstreaming, knowledge and openness (or lack of it) of school staffs, emotional/social/cultural factors, and communication problems.  I think every school administrator should see it, as well as teachers, parents, and also students, since they are the peers of the kids who are joining the mainstream and need to have as much of their interaction as possible be positive and supportive.  ...excellent handling of bilingual aspects."
-Ruth E. Andersen, Ph.D., Program Specialist, Children with Special Health Care Needs Program
Texas Dept. of Health



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