RE: [Videolib] Internet 2

Mark W. Kopp (iu8film@iu08.org)
Wed, 30 Jul 2003 13:41:17 -0400

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Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
boundary="=====================_20008847==.ALT"

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Debbie,

I am not sure why you might be having a problem with the link. I linked
directly from your e-mail, so I would suggest copy and paste the link
directly into your browser.

Although you will not keep the formatting, I copied the article into this
message, but I do not know if some of the reference links will forward
correctly.

Internet 2 now open to K-12
Dennis Pierce, News Editor
December 1, 1999

The group behind the Internet2 (I2) initiative to provide a super-fast
network backbone for advanced research applications over the internet has
just opened participation in the project to include K-12 schools.

Douglas E. Van Houweling, president and chief executive officer of the
University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), unveiled
the new policy Oct. 19 at the Sc
advertisement
1314ee2.jpg
hool Technology Management 2000 conference sponsored by eSchool News and
held in Washington, D.C.

The decision to invite K-12 schools to participate in I2 was made by member
universities at their Fall 1999 Internet2 Member Meeting in Seattle, Oct.
10-13. Though the details are still being worked out, Van Houweling said
each member university will be allowed to partner with one or more K-12
school systems to offer connectivity through a regional switching center
called a gigaPoP.

To take advantage of the ultra high-speed access, participating K-12
schools must have at least category-5 cable with switched 100 megabit (MB)
Ethernet connections inside their buildings and at least a 50 MB pipeline
running into the school, Van Houweling said.

Until now, I2 has been solely the province of the higher education
community, though its high-speed access and applications eventually will be
made available commercially.

Launched in 1996 to support a new generation of network-based research and
learning applications that the current internet is too slow to support, I2
currently consists of two separate backbones, Abilene and vBNS (very high
performance Backbone Network Service).

Abilene, which debuted in March, already has linked together 60 colleges
and universities, and an additional 22 were in the process of connecting to
the network as of October. According to UCAID, Abilene allows for the
transfer of 2.4 gigabits (billion bits) of data per secondthat's 1,600
times faster than a T-1 line.

In addition to high-speed connectivity, the announcement means that K-12
schools will have the opportunity to team with leading research
universities to provide cutting-edge learning applications to their
students online, such as:

Digital libraries. At Carnegie Mellon University, video footage from CNN is
fed to and stored on a university server through a project called
Informedia. Students and faculty can search for video segments by keyword;
a search using the word "Kosovo," for example, would generate up to 12
postage stamp-sized clips at a time on your computer screen. When you pass
the cursor over one of the clips, the date and time it originally aired and
the first phrase of the clip appear at the bottom of your screen; clicking
on the image will give you a full-screen, full-motion video replay. "It's
TV under the control of the learner," Van Houweling said.

Audio collections. Indiana University's Variations project has archived an
extensive collection of music that is available to students enrolled in the
university's music program over the internet. Students (and faculty) can
play audio clips just like they can with a CD playerthey can forward,
pause, replay, or jump to the next movement of a piece to study it in
greater detail.

'Virtual laboratories' and collaborative research. Through its Distributed
NanoManipulator project, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
provides students with real-time access to remote sensing instruments in
laboratories all over the world. Using a digital pencil connected to a
scanning probe electron microscope, for example, students can manipulate a
tobacco leaf under a remote microscope to study a plant virus.

'Tele-immersion' (shared virtual reality). Tele-immersion changes what is
possible through distance learning by allowing individuals at different
locations to interact in a single virtual environment and communicate with
each other in real time. The University of Illinois at Chicago's Virtual
Temporal Bone project, for example, lets researchers in separate locations
manipulate and share a single 3-D virtual image such as the bone structures
in the human ear.

High-definition television (HDTV). In September, ResearchTV, a consortium
of leading research institutions working to create greater access to
research information, teamed with Sony Electronics to demonstrate the
first-ever streaming of HDTV over the internet. A 40-minute stream of HDTV
video was sent over the Internet2 backbone from Stanford University in Palo
Alto to the University of Washington in Seattle in an almost "dropless" 270
megabit connection. "HDTV over the internet brings us closer to a more
perfect transfer of visual data," said Amy Philipson, executive director of
ResearchTV. "Particularly in the case of accessing vivid images that are
important to the progress of research activity. This is one of the highest
speed applications ever run over the internet."

To enable these high-bandwidth applications over the second-generation
internet, the I2 project incorporates the following new features:

Quality of service. Through its QBone initiative, I2 is building the
capability to schedule the necessary bandwidth for an application directly
into the network, thereby guaranteeing that when you start an application,
it won't quit when other applications are launched simultaneously.

Multicasting (as opposed to broadcasting). Right now, if you broadcast
something over the internet to a million viewers, you need a million
different connections out from the server. Multicasting lets you fan out a
single connection from the server to multiple viewers, thereby saving
bandwidth and boosting transmission speeds.

Distributed storage. The I2's Distributed Storage Infrastructure (I2-DSI)
is a replicated hosting service for internet content and applications. DSI
consists of servers with substantial processors and storage capacities
located throughout the U.S. Each user request is directed to the server
closest to the requesting client. The result is that network traffic is
kept local and load is balanced among the distributed servers. "If you can
cache items locally, then performance [of the network] is greatly
improved," Van Houweling noted.

Member universities and K-12 districts will be responsible for setting the
terms and conditions of their partnerships to bring I2 applications and
connectivity speeds to K-12 students, Van Houweling said.

Currently, 163 member universitiesrepresenting all 50 U.S. statesare
involved in the I2 initiative, and there are about 30 gigaPoPs nationwide
for connecting to the high-speed network. A complete list of members and a
map of gigaPoP sites are available on the Internet2 web site (see link below).

Internet2 Project
<http://www.internet2.edu>http://www.internet2.edu

Carnegie Mellon University
<http://www.cmu.edu>http://www.cmu.edu

Indiana University's Variations Project
<http://www.music.indiana.edu/variations>http://www.music.indiana.edu/variations

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
<http://www.unc.edu>http://www.unc.edu

University of Illinois at Chicago
<http://www.uic.edu>http://www.uic.edu

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At 11:36 AM 7/30/03 -0400, you wrote:

>Mark I would be interested in learning more about this, but the below link
>appears not to be working. I even tried
><http://www.eschoolnews.com/>www.eschoolnews.com and couldnt get
>anything. Have you accessed the site lately? Have any problems accessing it?
>
>
>
>Thanks.
>
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Mark W. Kopp [mailto:iu8film@iu08.org]
>Sent: Wednesday, July 30, 2003 10:58 AM
>To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
>Subject: [Videolib] Internet 2
>
>
>
>For those of you who are interested in IP delivery of Digitized Video,
>this should be of great interest. Internet2 is the next step in IP
>evolution. It provides for astronomical download speeds and is being
>developed by the educational community, primarily at the University level.
>
>The speeds of I2 are so fast that with an I2 connection, you could
>download a full 4.5 gig DVD (that's a DVD, not a CD) in less than 3
>seconds! It might not be feasible for most institutions right now, but it
>is the future of the web. This would allow full motion streaming to be the
>norm rather than a wish.
>
>The link provided is to an article from eschoolnews, an e-zine for
>educators, so you'll have to enter your name and register to view the
>article...but it's well worth your time.
>
>Announcement of I2 availability to K-12 institutions:
>http://www.eschoolnews.com/news/showStory.cfm?ArticleID=344&ref=wo
>
>****************************************************************************
>Mark W. Kopp
>Circulation Coordinator
>Appalachia Intermediate Unit 8
>Instructional Materials Services Department
>580 Foot of Ten Road
>Duncansville, Pa 16635
>(814) 695-1972 Phone
>(814) 695-3018 Fax
>E-Address:
>mailto:iu8film@iu08.org
>See us on the Web at:
><http://www.iu08.org>http://www.iu08.org
>Click on; "Instructional Materials Services"

--=====================_20008847==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"

Debbie,

I am not sure why you might be having a problem with the link. I linked directly from your e-mail, so I would suggest copy and paste the link directly into your browser.

Although you will not keep the formatting, I copied the article into this message, but I do not know if some of the reference links will forward correctly.


Internet 2 now open to K-12
Dennis Pierce, News Editor
December 1, 1999

The group behind the Internet2 (I2) initiative to provide a super-fast network backbone for advanced research applications over the internet has just opened participation in the project to include K-12 schools.

Douglas E. Van Houweling, president and chief executive officer of the University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), unveiled the new policy Oct. 19 at the Sc

advertisement
1314ee2.jpg
hool Technology Management 2000 conference sponsored by eSchool News and held in Washington, D.C.

The decision to invite K-12 schools to participate in I2 was made by member universities at their Fall 1999 Internet2 Member Meeting in Seattle, Oct. 10-13. Though the details are still being worked out, Van Houweling said each member university will be allowed to partner with one or more K-12 school systems to offer connectivity through a regional switching center called a gigaPoP.

To take advantage of the ultra high-speed access, participating K-12 schools must have at least category-5 cable with switched 100 megabit (MB) Ethernet connections inside their buildings and at least a 50 MB pipeline running into the school, Van Houweling said.

Until now, I2 has been solely the province of the higher education community, though its high-speed access and applications eventually will be made available commercially.

Launched in 1996 to support a new generation of network-based research and learning applications that the current internet is too slow to support, I2 currently consists of two separate backbones, Abilene and vBNS (very high performance Backbone Network Service).

Abilene, which debuted in March, already has linked together 60 colleges and universities, and an additional 22 were in the process of connecting to the network as of October. According to UCAID, Abilene allows for the transfer of 2.4 gigabits (billion bits) of data per secondthat's 1,600 times faster than a T-1 line.

In addition to high-speed connectivity, the announcement means that K-12 schools will have the opportunity to team with leading research universities to provide cutting-edge learning applications to their students online, such as:

Digital libraries. At Carnegie Mellon University, video footage from CNN is fed to and stored on a university server through a project called Informedia. Students and faculty can search for video segments by keyword; a search using the word "Kosovo," for example, would generate up to 12 postage stamp-sized clips at a time on your computer screen. When you pass the cursor over one of the clips, the date and time it originally aired and the first phrase of the clip appear at the bottom of your screen; clicking on the image will give you a full-screen, full-motion video replay. "It's TV under the control of the learner," Van Houweling said.

Audio collections. Indiana University's Variations project has archived an extensive collection of music that is available to students enrolled in the university's music program over the internet. Students (and faculty) can play audio clips just like they can with a CD playerthey can forward, pause, replay, or jump to the next movement of a piece to study it in greater detail.

'Virtual laboratories' and collaborative research. Through its Distributed NanoManipulator project, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides students with real-time access to remote sensing instruments in laboratories all over the world. Using a digital pencil connected to a scanning probe electron microscope, for example, students can manipulate a tobacco leaf under a remote microscope to study a plant virus.

'Tele-immersion' (shared virtual reality). Tele-immersion changes what is possible through distance learning by allowing individuals at different locations to interact in a single virtual environment and communicate with each other in real time. The University of Illinois at Chicago's Virtual Temporal Bone project, for example, lets researchers in separate locations manipulate and share a single 3-D virtual image such as the bone structures in the human ear.

High-definition television (HDTV). In September, ResearchTV, a consortium of leading research institutions working to create greater access to research information, teamed with Sony Electronics to demonstrate the first-ever streaming of HDTV over the internet. A 40-minute stream of HDTV video was sent over the Internet2 backbone from Stanford University in Palo Alto to the University of Washington in Seattle in an almost "dropless" 270 megabit connection. "HDTV over the internet brings us closer to a more perfect transfer of visual data," said Amy Philipson, executive director of ResearchTV. "Particularly in the case of accessing vivid images that are important to the progress of research activity. This is one of the highest speed applications ever run over the internet."

To enable these high-bandwidth applications over the second-generation internet, the I2 project incorporates the following new features:

Quality of service. Through its QBone initiative, I2 is building the capability to schedule the necessary bandwidth for an application directly into the network, thereby guaranteeing that when you start an application, it won't quit when other applications are launched simultaneously.

Multicasting (as opposed to broadcasting). Right now, if you broadcast something over the internet to a million viewers, you need a million different connections out from the server. Multicasting lets you fan out a single connection from the server to multiple viewers, thereby saving bandwidth and boosting transmission speeds.

Distributed storage. The I2's Distributed Storage Infrastructure (I2-DSI) is a replicated hosting service for internet content and applications. DSI consists of servers with substantial processors and storage capacities located throughout the U.S. Each user request is directed to the server closest to the requesting client. The result is that network traffic is kept local and load is balanced among the distributed servers. "If you can cache items locally, then performance [of the network] is greatly improved," Van Houweling noted.

Member universities and K-12 districts will be responsible for setting the terms and conditions of their partnerships to bring I2 applications and connectivity speeds to K-12 students, Van Houweling said.

Currently, 163 member universitiesrepresenting all 50 U.S. statesare involved in the I2 initiative, and there are about 30 gigaPoPs nationwide for connecting to the high-speed network. A complete list of members and a map of gigaPoP sites are available on the Internet2 web site (see link below).

Internet2 Project
http://www.internet2.edu

Carnegie Mellon University
http://www.cmu.edu

Indiana University's Variations Project
http://www.music.indiana.edu/variations

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
http://www.unc.edu

University of Illinois at Chicago
http://www.uic.edu


| Recommend this story to a colleague | Send us a news tip | Discuss in Forums | Printer Friendly Version | Reprints |

Would you recommend this article?
Never  1  - 2  - 3  - 4  - 5  Definitely
1314ef1.jpg 
www.eschoolnews.com
info@eschoolnews.com
7920 Norfolk Ave., Suite 900
Bethesda, MD 20814
(800) 394-0115 - Fax (301) 913-0119

Privacy Policy
Contents Copyright 2003 eSchool News. All rights reserved.


This Week Online

Data management for NCLB success
In this Special Report, eSchool News examines several solutions that can help you make a successful transition to data-driven decision making....

Wednesday, July 30, 2003
NEWS
Current Issue
Past Issues
Search Archives
Search Buyers' Guide:  
RESOURCES
School Technology Buyer's Guide
Calendar
Educator's Resource Center
Forums
eNewsletters
Funding Center
Partners News
Special Reports
Site of the Week
Product Spotlight
Surveys
Readers' Choice Awards
SERVICES
Customer Service
Sitemap
Media Kit
Press Room
Content Exchange
About Us
Free Newsletters
Technology ALERT
K-12 Techwatch
eMail:

More info

| Recommend this story to a colleague | Send us a news tip | Discuss in Forums | Printer Friendly Version | Reprints |



At 11:36 AM 7/30/03 -0400, you wrote:

Mark I would be interested in learning more about this, but the below link appears not to be working.  I even tried www.eschoolnews.com and couldnt get anything.  Have you accessed the site lately?  Have any problems accessing it?

 

Thanks.

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark W. Kopp [mailto:iu8film@iu08.org]
Sent: Wednesday, July 30, 2003 10:58 AM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] Internet 2

 

For those of you who are interested in IP delivery of Digitized Video, this should be of great interest. Internet2 is the next step in IP evolution. It provides for astronomical download speeds and is being developed by the educational community, primarily at the University level.

The speeds of I2 are so fast that with an I2 connection, you could download a full 4.5 gig DVD (that's a DVD, not a CD) in less than 3 seconds! It might not be feasible for most institutions right now, but it is the future of the web. This would allow full motion streaming to be the norm rather than a wish.

The link provided is to an article from eschoolnews, an e-zine for educators, so you'll have to enter your name and register to view the article...but it's well worth your time.

Announcement of I2 availability to K-12 institutions:
http://www.eschoolnews.com/news/showStory.cfm?ArticleID=344&ref=wo

****************************************************************************
Mark W. Kopp
Circulation Coordinator
Appalachia Intermediate Unit 8
Instructional Materials Services Department
580 Foot of Ten Road
Duncansville, Pa  16635
(814) 695-1972 Phone
(814) 695-3018 Fax
E-Address:
mailto:iu8film@iu08.org
See us on the Web at:
http://www.iu08.org
Click on;   "Instructional Materials Services"

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